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1/4" Adjustable U Zinc - 22 Lbs. Box by Cascade Lead Products Ltd

$299.95 USD
A $446.25 value.
Item# 8606
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.



Product Description



These rigid Cascade cames are stronger than lead. Use adjustable "U" came for structural support and reinforcement on borders. Middle seam allows you to make slight adjustments to the channel.

1/4" Face. 5/32" Channel.
Approximately 67 pieces per box. Sorry, no backorders.

Sold in six foot lengths. Box weighs 22 pounds - a great savings off of the price when purchased per piece. Boxing and handling charge is included in the price.

Image below shows a variety of similar came products; image courtesy of Cascade.

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5 out of 5 stars
  •   1/4 inch zinc box
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Pros : I have purchased this item several times and am always happy with this item.
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