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6-1/2" Self Closing Tweezers

$5.95 USD
Item# 62605
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

  • Place small details with precision
  • Self closing – means no more dropping tiny pieces
  • Eliminate hand fatigue

Product Description

Eliminate Hand Strain While Holding Tiny Pieces Securely
These handy tweezers have one incredible feature that will make them a workshop favorite for nearly every artist. The self closing feature allows you to get a precise grip on any small item and maintain even pressure, eliminating hand fatigue. The durable stainless steel tweezers apply firm, even pressure, yet are easy to open. Use these fine point tweezers for placing frit in fusing projects, creating intricate designs in micro mosaics, setting stones in metal clay, placing millefiori in flameworked beads and more.

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4 out of 5 stars
  •   Excellent Strength!
By on
Pros : These tweezers are great for holding onto small items. I use them to do my mosaics and they really hold onto the glass. No slipping!
Cons : They do require a little hand strength in order to open them, but not too much.
Other Thoughts : These tweezers are a little bit bigger and stronger than those at the hardware store. They make a great third hand.
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