5 Oz Orange Opal Striker Fine Frit - 90 COE

$9.95 USD
Item# B012581
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

  • Fine frit is ideal for painting with glass and pate de verre
  • Striker glass matures to the color shown in image 2 upon firing
  • Conveniently packaged in resealable 5 oz. plastic jars
  • Made with 100% premium Bullseye Glass
  • Tested compatible, 90 COE


Product Description

Try a Little -- Top Quality Glass Frit in Small, Convenient Bottles
Bullseye frits are made from crushed, screened and magnetically cleaned Bullseye Fusible sheet glass. Use fine glass frit for your pate de verre and for mixing with glass medium for drawing, painting, or add pizazz to your fusing and kiln-formed glass jewelry.

Packaged in a wide-mouth 5 ounce bottle. It provides you with plenty of frit to last for a number of projects, but not so much that you waste space in your studio. They are convenient if you ever need to take your fusing supplies with you on the road. Fully compatible 90 COE.

Note: Striker glass matures to the color shown in image 2 upon firing. Colors may vary, depending on firing schedule, rate, atmosphere, and heat work. For color-sensitive projects, test before use. 

"Sunset in the Mountains" by artist Ron Whitehead from Delphi's Online Artist Gallery, "Tiger Tales" by artist Michael Schmaltz of Michaels GlasWerks from Delphi's Online Artist Gallery. 

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4 out of 5 stars
  •   Orange Frit
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Pros : This is definitely orange. Very bright and cheery.
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Jun 26, 2012
Amy Ferber from Bullseye Glass visited Delphi last week, and the Reactions were fantastic. She was here to give a free presentation about using Bullseye Reactive Glass. The two hour interactive presentation included a video, and a chance to look at samples of reactions that were created using a variety of techniques and different materials and what class would be complete without a pop quiz? Attendees were asked to review the samples and identify what was used to make them. Everyone had a fantastic time. After the presentations I was able to sit down with Amy for a few minutes and talk. Here are a few of the questions I managed to sneak into her whirlwind vist Q What is the COE of Bullseye? A Although many people like to categorize glass neatly by a COE number, compatibility is actually more complex than that. Bullseye kiln glass is around
Feb 04, 2016
Frit Molds are becoming increasingly more popular, especially with all the new styles of jewelry molds coming out. Getting a beautiful finished project can be tricky at times. Issue #1 Glass tends to stick; and create sharp daggers on the sides of the glass project. This can happen when the glass separator is getting thin or worn away. Boron Nitride MR-97 is the answer. It is a versatile product that can also be used on stainless steel molds as well. Think of it like teflon on your frying pan. It will not allow the glass to stick to the mold. Projects pop right out and are ready to wear. You do have to follow the instructions and reapply as directed. Watch a video on how to use Boron Nitride MR-97. However if you do get spurs on the sides of your project, simply use a wet hand sanding pad
Nov 01, 2011
As a self-described cheap glass artisan who lives in rural Maine,finding or making the tools I need myself (rather than buying them online and having them shipped) is a must. As a total beginner, I found that making frit with my scrap glass was actually messier and more dangerous than I had originally suspected. Hammering away on my back deck proved to be a situation which resulted in wasted scrap glass...and tons of cuts.I finally admitted finding a proper tool to make my own frit was a necessity (to my deck AND my hands) - but $50 (plus shipping) for a Frit Piston was just not in my budget. So I took an hour to roam the Home Depot (which, yes, even in rural Maine you will find one) for ideas on how to hack my own solution. What I came up with, after wandering the isles for an