Bullseye Black Opal Gold Iridized Thin - 90 COE

Unit Size* Price Qty 
small 8" x 10" $20.25 USD
medium 10" x 16" $40.45
large 16" x 20" $80.85

Item# B010058
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • Good for Fusing - 90 COE
  • Consistent Pattern and Texture
  • Premium Handmade Glass


Product Description

Gold Iridized Glass Creates a Gorgeous Look
Unlike other iridized glass that offer a rainbow effect, this glass has a consistent gold colored sheen. Bullseye's iridescent thin sheets are ideal for delicate kiln work and precise additions to layered works of jewelry. Its unique matte iridized finish is designed to withstand the high heat of fusing. Glass is safe for food bearing surfaces.

Thin-rolled is 2 mm thick and tested compatible for fusing. 90 COE.

Photo above is a general representation of glass colors. Colors may vary. Sizes are Approximate.

Customer Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
5 star  
  2
4 star
  0
3 star
  0
2 star
  0
1 star
  0
See all customer reviews
Write a customer review

Product Images from Customers

Be the first to share product images with other customers
5 out of 5 stars
  •   Beautiful!
By on
Pros : I love the look of this glass. It has a sophistication that is lovely.
Cons :
Was this review helpful to you?  
5 out of 5 stars
  •   Love it!
By on
Pros :
Cons : None
Was this review helpful to you?  

See all customer reviews
Related Content
Jul 07, 2010
The official answer from the glass manufacturers is, All tested compatible glasses have been tested by the FDA for food bearing surfaces and were determined to be suitable.However, if you add other processes or compounds to the items, for example paint, stains, decals, glazes, etc. it is important to check that these items are also approved for food bearing surfaces. In addition it is of the utmost importance that dinnerware items be properly annealed, especially if youre going to place hot food on them - the thermal shock could cause a break in poorly annealed items. This Randys ProTip brought to you from the book Introduction to Glass Fusing by Petra Kaiser. VisitWardell Publications. Also, at Delphi we take food safety and dinnerware very seriously. We always recommend that certain glasses are capped with clear. These are usually irids, dichro and glass with texture, since these can also trap
Jul 28, 2010
No oneknowstheexactorigins of glass fusing although there is evidence that the Egyptians were familiar withrudimentary techniques. The Romans however arenoted by scholars for developingrefined glass fusing skills. Although technology has changed the way modern glass fuserswork,the technique isessentially the same as those developed by the Romans centuries ago. The basic technique involvesstacking two or morelayers of fusible glass, which are then placed in a kiln and gradually heated to between 1450-1500 Fahrenheit.At these temperatures the layers of glass fuse, or melt together and become one. Unfortunately, glass kilnsare large andexpensive,whichkeeps most Hobbyists from pursuing this art form. Now there are new kiln options, including theThe Fuseworks Microwave Kiln. This device works in most household microwaves and can fuse glass in about 3 minutes. Here are some common questions we get on fusing in this modern-day kiln. The following are Q A complied by Diamond Tech, the manufacturer of Fuseworks