Bullseye Pink Opal Striker Double Rolled - 90 COE

Unit Size* Price Qty 
small 8" x 10" $30.85 USD
medium 10" x 16" $61.65
large 16" x 20" $123.25

Item# B030130
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • Good for Fusing - 90 COE
  • Consistent Pattern and Texture
  • Premium Handmade Glass

Product Description

Create with Premium Bullseye Glass!
Premium handmade Bullseye glass is ideal for high-quality kiln work. Specifically formulated and tested for compatibility, this glass withstands multiple firings for complex projects without devitrification. The flatter double-rolled surface minimizes bubble entrapment, so colors can be layered for custom hues. A subtle "catspaw" texture allows modest light transmission when used in stained glass projects, creating an organic look.

Bullseye Pink Opal Striker is a lead-bearing glass that may react with glass that contains Sulphur/Selenium. The Standard thickness is 3 mm. 90 COE. 

Note: Striker glass matures to the color shown upon firing. Colors may vary, depending on firing schedule, rate, atmosphere, and heat work. For color-sensitive projects, test before use.

Photo above is a general representation of glass colors. Colors may vary. Sizes are Approximate.

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1 out of 5 stars
  •   Not pink
By on
Pros : Can't think of a pro.
Cons : Doesn't look at all like it picture. Not much pink in it. More cloudy blue and very see through for an opal.
Other Thoughts : Wouldn't buy it again.
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