Bullseye Crystal Clear Double Rolled - 90 COE

Unit Size* Price Qty 
small 8" x 10" $13.65 USD
medium 10" x 16"
$27.25
sale $19.95
large 16" x 20"
$54.45
sale $39.75

Item# B140130
Availability: Expected to be available December 26, 2020. Subject to change. Pre-order now!

Product Features

  • Crystal clear is formulated to be non-reactive to metal inclusions
  • Double rolled surface is smoother and minimizes bubble entrapment
  • Premium handmade glass
  • Tested compatible - 90 COE

Product Description

Create with Premium Bullseye Glass!
Premium handmade Bullseye glass is ideal for high-quality kiln work. Specifically formulated and tested for compatibility, this glass withstands multiple firings for complex projects without devitrification. The flatter double-rolled surface minimizes bubble entrapment, so colors can be layered for custom hues. Standard thickness 3mm. 90 COE.

Formulated to be non-reactive to metal inclusions, this glass is ideal for layering over silver, copper and brass. Crystal Clear also provides exceptional clarity, with no tint to alter or effect the hue of your color palette. Use this glass when keeping colors true is essential.

Photo above is a general representation of glass colors. Colors may vary. Sizes are Approximate.

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4 out of 5 stars
  •   Crystal Clear, Excellent
By on
Pros : Very smooth and clear, gives pieces a well-polished finish. Put on top of your plates, jewelry and etc. for the perfect finish.
Cons : Thick, can be hard to cut. Just make sure you score well and clean.
Other Thoughts : The perfect clear glass layer!
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