1/4" Silver Lined Foil - 1.0 Mil

$12.95 USD
Buy 3 or more for $10.95 each
Item# 425682
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • Silver core to match solder color
  • Built-in dispenser keeps roll orderly
  • 1/4" width for thicker and textured glass

Product Description

Studio Pro Silver Lined Copper Foil will attach securely to glass edges and corners to provide a smooth, uniform solder bead. Built-in plastic dispenser keeps rolls orderly. 1/4" wide for foiling thicker and textured glass. Standard 1.0 millimeter thickness. 108 foot rolls.

When To Use:
Silver-lined copper foil has an internal silver core to match solder color. Use with clear, non-opalescent glass and mirror.

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5 out of 5 stars
  •   Studio Pro silverback foil
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Pros : Finally, I found a silverbacked copperfoil that sticks. Any I have tried in the past (canfield mainly) is horrible. Recommend highly just on that basis. Try it!!
Cons : A little fragile (can tear sometimes, but can work around the problem.) Also, seems to wrinkle when applied. I use a wallpaper seamroller to burnish and that helps iron out the wrinkles.
Other Thoughts : I say buy just on the basis of good stickiness. I haven't used 1/4 in the past, but think I will go to it. It is only 1/32 of an inch wider than standard 7/32, or half that on each side of the glass. A little more expensive, but really helps to make straighter solder lines. Try 1/4 inch and see how you like it. Because it is thin, Foiling seems to work better when using an actual foiler.
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