7/32" Black Lined Foil - 1.0 Mil

$11.95 USD
Buy 3 or more for $10.15 each
Item# 425685
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • Easy to apply copper foil tape for stained glass art
  • Black core hides the appearance of foil on transparent glass
  • Built-in dispenser keeps roll orderly
  • Standard 7/32" width good for most stained glass projects


Product Description

Studio Pro Black Lined Copper Foil will attach securely to glass edges and corners to provide a smooth, uniform solder bead. Built-in plastic dispenser keeps rolls orderly. Standard 7/32" width and 1.0 millimeter thickness. 108 foot rolls.

When To Use:
Black-lined copper foil has an internal black core to help hide the appearance of the foil. Use on clear, non-opalescent glass and mirror.

Fish project created by artist Carrie Knickerbocker. Santa project pattern by Dodge Studio Designs. Artist: Jenny Neat. From Delphi's Online Artist Gallery.

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Related Content
Sep 13, 2010
Can you please tell me the correct way to mitre the lead for diamonds? Diamonds can be tricky. This diagram shows the way we would go about cutting the lead for a diamond. We find the easiest way to decide where to mitre the lead is by drawing lines on the diamond connecting the opposite points. Then, put a piece of lead on the glass and extend that line onto the lead. Now remove the lead and cut it where you marked. Replace it on the glass, lining it up where it belongs and mark the other end of that piece of lead. Cut it, replace it, and continue until all of the pieces of lead are cut. Reprinted with permission from Stained Glass News. All rights reserved.
Oct 12, 2010
When cutting out a pattern, where do you cut? With the proper scissors, is it on the line or left or right of the line? If, by proper scissors, you mean the three-bladed pattern shears, you want to cut by placing the center blade of the shears right on pattern line. The two outside blades will then cut the pattern on either side of the center blade. This removes a small strip of paper between each of the pattern pieces. You need to make sure youre using the right shears for the method of construction youve decided to use. Foil shears allow for two thicknesses of copper foil. Lead shears have a thicker center blade which allows for the heart of lead came. If you are using regular scissors (that dont have the extra blade) you will need to cut twice, once on each side of the line, for your
Nov 05, 2010
My panels always grow, even though I use pattern shears. Should the pieces, once cut and ground, fit in the white part of the pattern leaving the black lines to represent lead or foil? That is exactly where the pieces should fit. But as you have found out, sometimes thats easier said than done. Lets take a look at all the places your pieces can grow 1) Making a copy of your pattern for cutting out pattern pieces. First, determine if the line width on your pattern is appropriate for copper foil or lead. When tracing the pattern, try a few different felt pens until you find one that is the appropriate width for the technique you are using. The wrong width pen may cause the pattern pieces to be either too big, or too small. A good way to determine the appropriate width is to make some test cuts