7/32" Copper Backed Foil - 1.5 Mil

$9.95 USD
Buy 3 or more for $6.75 each
Item# 5561
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • Flexible copper foil created for the stained glass artisan
  • High tack and heat resistant adhesive back securely holds foil in place
  • Use when working with opalescent glass, and transparent glass when you will be using copper patina
  • Standard 7/32" foil width for most stained glass projects


Product Description

Top quality, Venture brand foil. 108 feet long. 1.5mil thick. 7/32" wide.

Standard and width for stained glass projects. Many of our customers enjoy 1.5mil thick tape for its heavy weight and durability.

Telling your foil apart is easy with Venture Foil Tape. The inside ring for 1.5mil is always red or dark pink for easy identification.

Project by artist Beth Kauffman. From "Illuminations" book #5997.

Delphi Tip: Choosing the Correct Foil
When using transparent glass and bevels, choose your foil based on the color of your solder seams.

  • Choose copper backed foil if using a copper patina
  • Choose black backed foil if you are using black patina
  • Choose silver backed foil if you are leaving your solder silver
Choose the correct foil image

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Related Content
Oct 16, 2017
When creating stained glass art, the size and type of foil can be tricky. For newcomers to this type of glass art, many questions arise as to which copper foil is the right one to use. Fortunately, Delphi Glass has some handy tips to help you make the right choice every time. 1. Foil width You might be inclined to select foil that creates skinny lines, however they are not as strong. That’s because you can’t apply as much solder. For most projects, you’ll find 7/32” copper foil will be suitable, however if you vary the width of the foil it will add more depth. If you’re using thicker glass, 1/4" foil will create a seam of normal width. But if you want special effects, take a razor knife and trim the copper foil after you apply it to the glass. Creating distance in your piece can be done
Aug 09, 2010
I want to make some copper foil and lead projects for use outside. How do I protect them from the elements? If you construct your project using the lead technique, there isnt anything else you need to do. The cementing process weatherproofs the project. If you use the copper foil technique, you will want to make sure that there is something to prevent the copper foil from pulling away from the outer edges of the project when it gets wet. This can be accomplished by using a rigid metal channel (zinc, copper or brass) or by soldering a reinforcing wire around the perimeter of the piece. Another thing you should consider is using mosaic techniques. Either the direct or indirect methods are great for outdoor projects. Your supplier will have information on these techniques if you are unfamiliar with them. Whatever technique you choose to employ, it is best to
Aug 13, 2010
In my reading I keep seeing mentions of tinning. What is it, and how do I do it? Tinning is the term used to describe the action of putting a thin coat of solder over something else, for instance copper foil, a brass vase cap, or a soldering iron tip. One reason may be to protect the metal from the air, which is usually in reference to a soldering iron tip. The other purpose may be to color the metal underneath, which we’ll address here. You may have seen it suggested that you tin all exposed copper foil on the surface of a panel before running a solder bead. (You will need to apply flux before tinning and again before running the bead.) Some people feel that this allows them to run the final bead more easily because all of the foil edges are already covered. Other people prefer to