Diamond File Set For Glass Jewelry - 5 Piece Set

Price $27.95
Your Savings: - $8.00
Your Price: $19.95 USD   (29% Off)
Item# 60110
Availability: Expected to be available December 04, 2020. Subject to change. Pre-order now!

Product Features

  • Assorted shapes for every project
  • Tapered tips on rounded files fit even the smallest spaces

Available Substitutes

item: 77000
Diamond Hand Pad Pack
$114.95 $93.95
19% off
USD

Product Description

Easily Smooth Those Hard to Reach Spots! 
This 5 piece jewelry file set in assorted shapes makes it easy to reach even the hard to reach spaces. Durable, diamond coated hand files are a must-have for the glass jewelry artist. Tips include round, triangle, flat, knife edge and square. Files feature a color coded rubber grip (making it easy to grab your favorite profile at a glance), 2-5/8" long filing surface and range from 1/8" wide to 3/16" wide. 5-1/2" overall length.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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5 out of 5 stars
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5 out of 5 stars
  •   Very versatile.
By on
Pros : These are the perfect size for jewelry and for the small burrs that you sometimes get on glass castings. They don't bend or break, nice quality.
Cons : None.
Other Thoughts : I usually use a little water with them to cut down on any glass dust. These are great because I don't have to run down and use my grinder all the time.
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4 of 6 people found this review helpful
4 out of 5 stars
  •   Diamond File Set
By on
Pros : Very useful and versitile tools.
Cons : No instructions were included, but I assume you use these files wet.
Other Thoughts : I store these in a small container with the handles pointing down. Lets them dry & easy to select the one needed.
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2 of 4 people found this review helpful

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