5 Oz Caribbean Blue / White Streaky Coarse Frit - 90 COE

$9.95 USD
Item# B216483
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • Add subtle tones for texture and shading easily with streaky frit
  • Convenient 5 oz containers come with secure screw top lids
  • Made from premium Bullseye glass
  • 90 COE


Product Description

Something New to Love: Streaky Frit!
A staple for hot glass artists, you will find frit useful for many applications, including pate de verre casting molds. Made from 90 COE sheet glass, clean-crushed and screened. Packaged in convenient 5 oz. jars. Glass is opaque, coarse size grit. Achieve subtle shading with dual tone frit. 90 COE.

Project image courtesy of Bullseye Glass Co.

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