Bottle Slump Mold

Price $36.95
Your Savings: - $12.00
Your Price: $24.95 USD   (33% Off)
Item# 80674
Availability: Expected to be available December 18, 2019. Subject to change. Pre-order now!

Product Features

  • A stylish way to upcycle!
  • Mold fits a 750ml bottle
  • Ceramic molds can be used many times
  • Measures approximately 16" x 4-3/4"

Product Description

A stylish way to recycle, this mold fits a 750ml bottle. Or, use fusible glass to create your own clever serving tray for snacks. Makes a perfect housewarming gift. High quality slumping mold from Creative Paradise. Pre-drilled; always remember to elevate molds for proper air circulation. Apply kiln wash before use. See size perspective of mold with quarter image shown. Images courtesy of Creative Paradise. Measures 16" x 4-3/4". Exterior mold measurements listed.

For larger bottles, try 18" Bottle Sagger #62787.

Find firing tips, schedules and bottle slumping FAQ's .PDF's under additional images. These will help answer your basic bottle slumping questions as well as give you tips for firing schedules.

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5 out of 5 stars
  •   16
By on
Pros : Great mold. Excellent quality. Wonderful for making bottle dishes.
Cons : Does not accept wine bottles larger than the 750ml size.
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1 of 1 people found this review helpful
5 out of 5 stars
  •   Wine Bottle Spoon Holders
By on
Pros : I have several bottle slump molds. They are very easy to use and so far they are a no fail quick projects. My family loves the spoon rests I have made with them.
Cons :
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2 of 3 people found this review helpful
5 out of 5 stars
  •   Love This Mold
By on
Pros : Great mold for slumping bottles into a bowl design.
Cons :
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