Cross Jewelry Casting Mold

$19.95 USD
Item# 806189
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • Creates unique glass jewelry
  • Ceramic molds can be used many times
  • Fits in small kilns
  • Finish pieces measure 2" x 2-3/4"


Product Description

Unique mold design creates openings in the casting. Fill pendant molds with glass frit, scrap and powders to create one-of-a-kind cast glass jewelry. The possibilities are endless!

Coat molds with ZYP Boron Nitride Spray or casting mold primer before use. See size perspective of mold with quarter and dime images shown. Mold size is 3" x 3-1/3". Finish pieces measure 2" x 2-3/4". Durable ceramic molds can be used many times.

Mold uses 24 grams of frit or scrap glass. 

Images courtesy of Creative Paradise Inc.

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5 out of 5 stars
  •   Nice cross
By on
Pros : Successful fusings Nice cross shape
Cons : Too large for a pendant Center plug delicate, prepare carefully or will break off
Other Thoughts : This size makes a better Christmas tree ornament than a pendant. Although the one's I made are very attractive, I'd feel uncomfortable sporting such a large cross around my neck.
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5 out of 5 stars
  •   Very nice
By on
Pros : just the right size and the weight of the cross is nice
Cons : none
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