Morton Glass Caddy

$20.95 USD
Item# 7151
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

  • Keep your studio work area clean and organized
  • 15 slots, holds up to 32 square feet of glass
  • Use to hold completed projects or project guide books
  • A staple for glass artists


Product Description

Get Organized!
Use the Glass Caddy in your work area to organize the glass you're using for a current project. This glass rack has 15 slots and holds up to 32 square feet of stained glass. Base measures approximately 10-1/4" long x 4-1/2" wide. Posts measure approximately 5-1/4" tall.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star  
  15
4 star
  6
3 star
  1
2 star
  0
1 star
  0
See all 22 customer reviews
Write a customer review

Product Images from Customers

Be the first to share product images with other customers
5 out of 5 stars
  •  
By on
Pros :
Cons :
Was this review helpful to you?  
4 out of 5 stars
  •   Works very well
By on
Pros : Easy to put together and works well.
Cons :
Was this review helpful to you?  
5 out of 5 stars
  •   Jules
By on
Pros : Love this! Great way to safely and easily store my glass.
Cons :
Was this review helpful to you?  

See all 22 customer reviews
Related Content
May 14, 2012
Heres our list of 5 Favorite New Items from the May 2012 edition of Stained Glass News. 1. Hot, Hot, Hot by Christine Stewart Celebrated glass artist Christine Stewart brings us a long-anticipated new title. In her signature mosaic style she serves up 18 projects ranging from fused glass dinnerware to stunning mosaic wall art created with fused inclusions. 2. Inspired by Frankye Cartner and Suzy Huber This stained glass pattern portfolio contains 16 designs for panels in a variety of themes. Each project includes recommendations for using wire, bevels or other accents, and a suggested enlargement size. Projects are certain to provide a fun challenge for beginners and intermediate artists alike. 3. Assembling 3D art just got easier with Handy Wedges These simple non-slip foam rubber blocks offer the perfect solution when you find yourself in need of another set of hands. The triangular shape lends itself to
Jul 11, 2012
Part 1 of a 2 part blog on the basics of glass fusing. In this weeks article Donna will tell us how to set up your work area and gives suggestions on finding the perfect kiln. Often potential fusers ask about the cost of getting started in glass. I found that it isnt as expensive as one might think because the list of necessities for the beginner is not too long. So what would the list look like for someone who had NO experience at all? Well, this is what I began with, and I think you might find these ideas helpful. Space to Work- A place to cut glass can be fairly small. The most important detail is a floor surface such as concrete that will be easy to clean. I tried commercial tile in my first studio, and the shards were soon embedded under the work area. Obviously,
Jun 09, 2011
We scoured the web, asked our Delphi artists, questioned our fans on Facebook, and finally came up with 13 easy-to-implement tips for keeping things clutter-free. Feel free to share your own in our comments section below. 1. Choose an area with good lighting. If you have a window, keep the area clear, so light can flow in nicely. 2. Partition off the craft area (contain the craft creep) with a screen or furniture. 3. If you havent used something in 2 years, consider donating it to a school or senior center, selling to a buy-back program or tossing it. 4. Label everything. 5. Consider what tools and supplies you need the most. These should be easily accessible. Store the rest in clear bins. 6. If your space is limited, go vertical. Install a slat wall for easy shelving. From our Facebook fans 7. Scrapbooking paper shelves are also great for