Stained Glass Horse Patterns

$16.95 USD
Item# 6363
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • 27 Patterns
  • Key with piece count to help plan your project
  • 11 Designs shown finished in color


Product Description

Capture the Elegance of Horses in the Beauty of Stained Glass
Bring alive the spirit and beauty of horses with these stunning stained glass panel patterns. Ideal for beginner or intermediate stained glass artists. Patterns feature simple lines for easy cuts. Includes 27 realistic designs in a variety of styles, 11 colored images and a handy piece count reference guide.

Patterns include a rocking horse, carousel horse and Pegasus in addition to Native American Paint Ponies, a mare and foal, and more.

Project images shown come from the book. Designed and created by the author Lisa Tilson of Glass of Dreams Studio.

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  •   Stained Glass Horse Patterns
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Pros : Great patterns for the horse and Indian theme lover
Cons : Some of detail definately require a saw
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Jun 24, 2010
1. Make the glass strips as wide as youd like your mosaic chunks to be. Strips about 1/2 to 3/4 usually work well. 2. Snip small pieces off the strip. Aiming your mosaic cutter straight across the strip will produce squares and rectangles. Aiming the cutter at an angle (the same angle each time you cut) will give you diamonds. A combination of aiming straight across the strip and at alternating angles will produce triangles. 3. Once youve aimed the cutter, just squeeze the handles until a piece of glass breaks off. Or, you can snip pieces off a larger piece of glass. Cut near the edge and work towards the middle. This will produce random moon shaped pieces, which you can use to fill in small areas of background. They also make nice leaves.
Jun 07, 2010
1. Make sure that your pieces are clean and dry. Cut a piece of clear contact paper, remove the backing and lay it sticky-side-up over the pattern. 2. This is a perfect way to hold cut glass, globs, jewels, or marbles in place for tack soldering. As you can see in the photo, you can even move the sheet around and, if you are careful, you shouldn’t disturb the glass at all. 3. Tack solder the pieces to each other as you normally would. Then, remove the contact paper and finish soldering the front before turning the project over and soldering the back. Reprinted with permission from Stained Glass News. All rights reserved.
May 05, 2010
I have some questions about Lead-Free Solder. Does it tarnish over time? Can you use patina on it? Does it flow like regular solder? Is it better than regular solder? We are sure that you arent the only one with these questions. Lets start with the question of whether or not its better than regular solder. Since the harm from lead is caused by ingestion, any project that will come in contact with food or food containers should be made with lead-free solder. In addition, anything that is handled, like jewelry or kaleidoscopes, should be made with lead-free solder. Hands have a terrible habit of making it into the mouth before they get washed. So, yes it is better than regular solder in these situations. As far as working with solder, you should be diligent about cleaning your hands after touching any solder. Dont eat, drink, smoke, or do anything