Making Stained Glass Lamps

$23.95 USD
Item# 6163
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • Expert advice on tips and techniques
  • Includes over 5 full size patterns
  • Covers basic stained glass repair
  • 170 Pages


Product Description

Complete With Full Size Patterns
This title offers fully illustrated descriptions and expert advice on techniques that will let you create beautiful stained glass lamps. Includes sections on choosing the best glass; cutting, shaping, foiling and soldering; forming the lampshade cone; attaching a lamp cap; electrifying the lamp; and, repairing broken pieces. It also features over five handy full-size patterns and a gallery of finished designs.

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Oct 28, 2010
Does using a wider foil on my project make it stronger? Your project may be a little bit stronger with a wider foil since a wider solder line will tend to keep a seam from bending or flexing more than a narrower one. However, its not enough of a difference to be a major consideration in choosing a foil width for your project. The more likely reasons for choosing one foil width over another are as a design feature. You may want wider or narrower solder lines in certain areas of your project. to account for thicker or thinner glass. Youll need to choose an appropriate width of foil to have your solder line remain a consistent width. If you think strength or structure is a problem, some reinforcing other than just a wider foil is going to be necessary. For minor reinforcing, ask your supplier for a reinforcing strip.
Sep 20, 2010
Sometimes necessity is the mother of invention, and sometimes invention comes when you have nothing to lose. Early in my career, I had three metal-clay-and-fused-glass pendants fail in a single day. The glass cabochons simply shattered and fell away from the silver after the pieces were fired because I had neglected to cut an expansion hole underneath the cabochons. Augghh. Lesson learned. But now I was left with three ugly pieces of silver, each with small pieces of glass permanently fused into bizarre locations on the surfacea loss I could not afford. Weeks later, after tryingunsuccessfully to remove the glass, I decided to try fusing glass in patterns onto the surface of the pendants. The results were surprising, and the Stained Glass process was born This technique begins with any fired metal clay with a flat surface. Small shards of fusible glass are then attached to the silver. After
Oct 04, 2010
Twelve years ago Arlene saw an ad for a two-week workshop on stained glass. Arlene Wright-Correll and her husband Carl Correll had just retired from 43 successful years in business, the last 7 spent building and then running their own B&B and campgrounds on the Appalachian Trail. When Arlene approached her husband about taking the class together, Carl thought she was crazy -- he couldnt even cut glass. But being the good husband he was, he went along with her idea and became what Arlene affectionately calls, the Stained Glass Frankenstein Monster. For 12 years now, Carl has created and taught the art of stained glass. The couple began Avalon Stained Glass School & Creativity Center in December 1998. Between the two of them (currently ages 75 and 77), Arlene and Carl teach approximately 22 workshops in stained glass, leaded glass, etched glass, fused glass and all kinds of