The Magic Of Snowflakes II

$14.95 USD
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Item# 6800
Availability: Expected to be available February 01, 2021. Subject to change. Pre-order now!

  • Create stunning winter decor - book contains full sized patterns
  • Materials lists and full color photos for each design included
  • Create intricate handmade decorations or gifts
  • Features 17 different designs

Product Description

Let it Snow!
A great follow-up to Snowflakes I. Deverie Wood has created 17 more patterns of lovely snowflakes in her second volume. Utilizing straight line bevels eliminates most of the glass cutting, making projects fast and elegant. The inclusion of 1" rectangles in these designs makes snowflakes appear to unfold and expand before your eyes! Full size patterns, materials list and finished color photos.

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5 out of 5 stars
  •   excellent book
By on
Pros : great book, great projects
Cons : none
Other Thoughts : lets have volume 3
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5 out of 5 stars
  •   The Magic of Snowflakes II
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Pros : Wonderful assortments of patterns.
Cons : Would have like to see snowflake examples in colors not just clear glass.
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