300 Stained Glass Cabinet Door Designs

$17.95 USD
Item# 6078
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • Designs from Victorian to Contemporary fit any home decor
  • 300 patterns and 50 color photos to stir your imagination
  • Stained glass cabinet doors add beauty and interest to your home
  • 64 pages of patterns and photographs to inspire


Product Description

Update Your Kitchen with New Cabinet Doors!
This best selling book literally has hundreds of designs to choose from to create the absolutely most perfect cabinet doors for you and your home! Over 300 line designs and 50 color pictures of finished cabinets will stir your imagination and get you started on that kitchen overhaul. Choose from prairie, Victorian, contemporary, scenic, nature and bevel themes.

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5 out of 5 stars
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Pros : Such a wide variety can be offered.
Cons : nil
Other Thoughts : Lots of fun to be had, no boredom!
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4 out of 5 stars
  •   This pattern book is great
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Pros : A wonderful book of patterns, that go from simple to detailed. a wonderful purchase.
Cons : none
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Related Content
Jun 24, 2010
1. Make the glass strips as wide as youd like your mosaic chunks to be. Strips about 1/2 to 3/4 usually work well. 2. Snip small pieces off the strip. Aiming your mosaic cutter straight across the strip will produce squares and rectangles. Aiming the cutter at an angle (the same angle each time you cut) will give you diamonds. A combination of aiming straight across the strip and at alternating angles will produce triangles. 3. Once youve aimed the cutter, just squeeze the handles until a piece of glass breaks off. Or, you can snip pieces off a larger piece of glass. Cut near the edge and work towards the middle. This will produce random moon shaped pieces, which you can use to fill in small areas of background. They also make nice leaves.
May 20, 2012
Reinforcement is necessary on larger windows. As a rule of thumb, a window more than three square feet should be reinforced. Either reinforcing bar or rod may be used for support. Be sure to consider this when designing the window so that the reinforcement does not intrude or compromise the design of the finished work. In either case the reinforcement is soldered to the back of the panel in one of two ways. The bar should be pre-tinned before use. You will solder the bar in several places at intersecting lines on the window. Rough the areas to be soldered on the bar with steel wool. Apply flux and coat the areas with solder. Doing this will make soldering the bar to the window much easier. Place the bar on edge and solder to the window in the predetermined areas. When using rod, a length of pre-tinned wire is first
Jun 07, 2010
1. Make sure that your pieces are clean and dry. Cut a piece of clear contact paper, remove the backing and lay it sticky-side-up over the pattern. 2. This is a perfect way to hold cut glass, globs, jewels, or marbles in place for tack soldering. As you can see in the photo, you can even move the sheet around and, if you are careful, you shouldn’t disturb the glass at all. 3. Tack solder the pieces to each other as you normally would. Then, remove the contact paper and finish soldering the front before turning the project over and soldering the back. Reprinted with permission from Stained Glass News. All rights reserved.