Single Strength Float Glass

Unit Size* Price Qty 
medium 9" x 10" $3.95 USD
large 18" x 21" $7.85

Item# M3905
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • Good for Stained Glass Projects
  • Easy to Cut
  • Consistent Pattern and Texture


Product Description

Use float glass to create table top boxes, display cases, glass-on-glass mosaics, or use to press dried flowers or transform other keepsake items into a gorgeous gift.

Delphi Expert Tip: Use thin single strength float glass to sandwich any flat object to preserve a special memory. Create your own keepsake and gifts by pressing flowers, photos, or even paper!

Photo above is a general representation of glass colors. Colors may vary. Sizes are Approximate.

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3 out of 5 stars
  •   Perfect
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Pros : Great for what I needed it for, perfect thickness
Cons : Cut okay
Other Thoughts : The edges didn't come out as clean as I would have liked, not sure if it was the TOYO cutter I was using or the glass
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Oct 25, 2010
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