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Getting a Good Black Patina on Zinc

Getting a Good Black Patina on Zinc No two ways about it, getting a good black patina on zinc came can be a problem. But it is not impossible. I sometimes tell my students that the best thing about using zinc on their project, is that it will probably disappear inside their projects wood frame, but that doesnt have to be the case. Follow these few simple steps and youll find that, with a few modifications to standard patina finishing procedure, getting a nice dark finish on zinc isnt such a mystery after all. You wont be able to get a copper sulfate finish on zinc; the chemicals just wont work, but you can get a number of shades from light charcoal to black Step One Metal Prep Zinc fresh out of the case, like any other metal, will immediately begin to oxidize. You may not be able to see any visible signs of oxidation, but believe

How to: Fake a Kiln Rake

How to: Fake a Kiln Rake I know Ill never get up the nerve to open my kiln to rake. Instead, I was wondering, can I fake...I mean, rake it? I was recently in Monterey, CA visiting a shop on Cannery Row, where glass artist David Alcala is usually busy at work. The day I visited, he was out (at the Glass Art Bead Expo) promoting his new book and Flexi-Glass. His lovely wife was holding down the fort and I marveled at his landscapes made with fine glass frit. I knew I had a lot of Uroboros frit and powder at home, and it inspired me to try and fake a kiln rake with frit. I laid out a sheet of newspaper, and donned my goggles and face mask. I cut out a 10-inch transparent glass circle, so I would have a double-sided plate. Next, I sprinkled a bunch of purple powder, then white, and

Meet Delphi's Spring 2014 Guest Instructors

Meet Delphi's Spring 2014 Guest Instructors This Spring Delphi is excited to host two amazing glass artists at the Delphi Creativity Center in Lansing, MI. Mosaic artist Carol Shelkin and master of beveling, Kent Lauer, will both be teaching this Spring at Delphi. Each artist brings their own unique skill set and techniques that any student from beginner to professional artist would enjoy. Get to know each artist and their work, then see which class is right for you. Class sizes are limited so register now to ensure your opportunity to work with these amazing artists. Carol Shelkin Carol Shelkin creates contemporary fine art and intricate mosaic designs that feature eminent care and attention to detail using hand-cut, high-quality stained glass. Her life-long passion for art has been honed through studies at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art and under the tutelage of mosaic

Ring of Fire Artist Challenge Pushes the Limits of Creativity

Ring of Fire Artist Challenge  Pushes the Limits of Creativity Delphi Glass and ArtFire, the premier marketplace for handmade crafts, announce a new online art contest. The Ring of Fire Artist Challenge is open to all artisans. Entries are being accepted now. Contest ends June 30 and winners announced July 9, 2010. Following its annual festivities for National Art Glass Month, Delphi has organized another online event with the help of its partner ArtFire. The first annual Ring of Fire Artist Challenge is designed for all artisans of all crafts and abilities, inviting them to use common art supplies in new and creative ways. Artisans are asked to choose one or more items from the 10 products that make up the Ring of Fire. These items range from patterned dichroic glass and fine silver wire to mosaic tiles made entirely from recycled glass. Winners are chosen by popular vote and jury based on technical skill and creativity. A beginners category

Tiffany Art Exhibition Showcases Objects in New Ways

Tiffany Art Exhibition Showcases Objects in New Ways The Flint Institute of Arts (FIA) is currently hosting Tiffany Lamps Articles of Utility, Objects of Art - a celebration of Louis Comfort Tiffanys artistic contributions. According to the FIA website, the exhibition offers more than 40 stunning objects in an array of colors, sizes and decorative styles featured in five sections exploring themes of fabrication, design inspiration and changing lighting technologies. The show also includes tools, materials and photographs demonstrating how objects were designed and made. Tiffany is known for his stained glass windows and lamps, but he also created glass mosaics, blown glass pieces, ceramics, jewelry and metalwork. The first Tiffany Glass Company was incorporated 1885, which later became known as Tiffany Studios. His company concentrated on stained glass windows and lamps, but designed a myriad of other interior decorations. Tiffany Lamps Articles of Utility, Objects of Art Johnson and Rabiah Galleries 5.23.10 - 8.15.10 www.flintarts.org Community leaders

Do You Have the Messiest Art Glass Studio?

Do You Have the Messiest Art Glass Studio? If your art glass studio is a hot mess, enter our Messiest Art Glass Studio Contest and you could win $200 worth of organizational supplies from Delphi. How to Enter Email your photo to [email protected] May 23- May 31, 2011. We will post all photos to an album on Delphis Facebook page on June 1 for voting. How to Win Our Facebook fans will decide the winner. Whoevers photo gets the most likes wins. Voting wil begin June 1 and end June 9. Winner will be announced June 10, 2011. Prize Winner will receive $200 in studio organizational supplies from Delphi. The Fine Print This promotion is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by Facebook. You are providing your email address to Delphi Glass and not to Facebook. Delphi Glass will notify winner by replying to email address. Delphi Glass will not share your email address with anyone.

Learn from the Best- 2015 Delphi Guest Instructors

Learn from the Best- 2015 Delphi Guest Instructors We are gearing up for the Winter/Spring 2015 session of art glass classes at Delphis Creativity Center in Lansing, MI. This year accomplished glass artists Tim Drier and Carol Shelkin will bring their talent and expertise to Delphi to help students upgrade their skills. Get to know each artist and their work, then see which class is right for you. Class sizes are limited so register now to ensure your opportunity to work with these amazing artists. Tim Drier Tim Drier has been a glassblower for 25 years, and applies his scientific glassblowing expertise to artistic flameworking. He concentrates on creating decanters, goblets, vases, and human sculptural forms. Drier has taught flameworking courses at The Studio and the Pittsburgh Glass Center, and has demonstrated at the International Flameworkers Conference at Salem Community College. Check out Tims work on his Corning Museum of Glass page or his Pinterest

Dear Delphi: What's Hot in Jewelry Now?

Dear Delphi: What's Hot in Jewelry Now? Do you have a question or comment? Please contact us at [email protected] Dear Delphi, I am a stay at home Mom who loves jewelry. I am looking at different ideas on how to make some extra income and not be away from my two daughters. I have some basic skills but I am more interested in what is hot on the fashion scene. Can you help? Thanks for asking, and we think we have some great ideas and simple solutions for you.The big looks today involve color and metal. Some examples of metal that have become extremely popular are fine and medium gauge wires in sliver and sterling. These wires are used as hooks, shapes and handmade intricate designs. The openness of the wire and delicate sheen of the silver or sterling will give enough bling to your designs.I recommend the book Totally Twisted. It is an outstanding reference

Ring of Fire Artist Challenge Winners Announced

Ring of Fire Artist Challenge Winners Announced The Ring of Fire Artist Challenge, lasting from May-June, sparked the interest of artists of varied media all across the country. While Delphi received entries of paper, glass, ceramics, wire, jewelry, etc., it was a select group of 10 products that united them all. Every eligible entry incorporated at least one of 10 unique products making up the Ring of Fire. These products included copper metal mesh, millifiori, clear glaze, dichroic scrap, recycled glass tiles, metallic tiles, color slide, krafty blok, fine silver wire and pressed flowers. Below is a complete list of contest winners. Congratulations to Grand Prize winner of the Jen-Ken Deluxe EZ-Pro Kiln, Kristin Simpson, with her Garden Whimsie entry. Also, congratulations to Lisa Norvell for her Mountain Meadow Surprise entry which will be featured in an upcoming Delphi catalog. Stay tuned for other great contests like this one in the near future. Delphi Awards Delphis

Contest: Where in the World Do You Read Your Delphi Catalog?

Contest: Where in the World Do You Read Your Delphi Catalog? If you find yourself reading our catalog in the most unusual places, enter our catalog contest, sponsored by Uroboros Glass, for a chance to win a glass pack worth more than $100. How to Enter Email your photo(s) to [email protected], (there is no limit to the number of photos you may submit), by Nov. 18, 2011. Well post an album of all the (appropriate, please) photos on Delphis Facebook page, and our fans will like their favorites. The person who submitted the photo with the most likes as of midnight EST on Nov. 25, 2011 will be the winner. Winner will be notified via email. Winner will be allowed to choose either the Flower Power Stained Glass Pack or the Hot Colors 96 Glass Fusing Pack from Uroboros Glass. Contest open to residents of contiguous US states only. How to Win Our Facebook fans will decide the winner. Whoevers photo

6 Tips for Decorating Your Thanksgiving Table with Glass

6 Tips for Decorating Your Thanksgiving Table with Glass Show off your art glass creations. Here are 6 easy and inexpensive ways to incorporate art glass into your Thanksgiving dinner table dcor. 1. Glass bottles are easy and inexpensive to use. Cut the bottoms of glass bottles of varying heights. Place over votive candles, and decorate with etching, twine, ribbon and other found objects. Download instructions on how to make the centerpiece pictured top right. I also love these amber-colored bottle hurricanes I found onEtsy (at right). They provide just the right amount of romantic ambiance for the dinner table. 2. Decorate pillar candles with glass frit for extra sparkle. In browing for Thanksgiving inspiration online, I ran across this great idea by HGTV to roll pillar candles in lentils for a unique table decoration. Then I thought, why not roll them in glass frit. The frit

Grind Glass Without a Glass Grinder

Grind Glass Without a Glass Grinder I love my glass grinder. In fact, I have a couple of them. But I dont grind every piece of glass that I cut. For me, its not necessary. If you can cut accurately, and by accurately I mean no bigger or smaller than your pattern, you may be able to cut down on your projects time by trying out a tool that Ive come to love and rely upon, my grinding stone. A grinding stone, or abrasive stone harks to an earlier day in the history of glass cutting, but still has its value when used in conjunction with good solid, glass scoring and breaking technique. In the pre-grinder days, these stones were de rigueur for the well equipped glazier and to put it simply, they got the job done. Learning to use the stone will take about thirty seconds of training; implementing it can save you hours.

Combining Fabric or Paper with Your Glass

Combining Fabric or Paper with Your Glass Did you know that you can sandwich fabric (or paper) between glass just like you do with pressed flowers? It sure opens up a lot of possibilities for creating one-of-a-kind projects. Heres how 1 Cut two pieces of thin clear glass (ideally, single strength or thinner) to match your pattern piece. Dull the edges of each piece, if necessary, with a fine grinder bit or scythe stone. 2 Carefully clean the surfaces of these pieces that will be on the inside of the sandwich. Once you have sandwiched the fabric inside the glass, you wont be able to clean the glass again. 3 Cut a piece of fabric to match the glass pieces you cut. 4 To create your sandwich, place the fabric on the bottom piece of glass (clean side up). Add the top piece of glass (clean side down). Now hold your sandwich together with a couple of

Removing a Frozen Grinder Head

Removing a Frozen Grinder Head The grinding head on my grinder is frozen on the motor shaft. How do I remove it? You may find that you can move the grinder head down, but not up and off, the shaft. This is due to the shaft becoming larger for one of two reasons. First, glass, dust and debris accumulate on the shaft. This coating builds up and makes the shaft larger. The second possibility is a nick or scar on the shaft, causing the same thing. In either case, push the bit down to get it out of the way. Then, using a fine steel wool, gently polish the motor shaft (with the motor running) for about a minute. The bit will usually then just lift right off. If this attempt does not work, you can apply an anti-seize liquid or spray (such as WD-40) onto the grinding head and motor shaft. Wait 10 or

Studio News: Tips for Using Frit Molds

Studio News: Tips for Using Frit Molds Frit Molds are becoming increasingly more popular, especially with all the new styles of jewelry molds coming out. Getting a beautiful finished project can be tricky at times. Issue #1 Glass tends to stick; and create sharp daggers on the sides of the glass project. This can happen when the glass separator is getting thin or worn away. Boron Nitride MR-97 is the answer. It is a versatile product that can also be used on stainless steel molds as well. Think of it like teflon on your frying pan. It will not allow the glass to stick to the mold. Projects pop right out and are ready to wear. You do have to follow the instructions and reapply as directed. Watch a video on how to use Boron Nitride MR-97. However if you do get spurs on the sides of your project, simply use a wet hand sanding pad

Glass Art Resolutions for the New Year

Glass Art Resolutions for the New Year As 2017 fast approaches, you’re probably thinking of what resolutions you’re going to make (and hopefully stick to) in the New Year. Perhaps it’s getting more exercise or eating more healthfully, the two most common resolutions people make every year. Those are great resolutions to make, but it’s also good to think outside the box when making your resolutions. Here are some suggestions for glass art resolutions to make. 1. Organize your creative space By taking a little time to organize and arrange your art glass tools and supplies, you’ll be saving yourself time in the long run. That means you’ll have more time to focus on what really matters being creative. Plus, when you keep things organized, you’ll know what supplies you need to stock up on. Nothing is more frustrating than being in the middle of a project only to realize you’re out of something you need. 2.

What Are Your Favorite Tools?

What Are Your Favorite Tools? No matter what you’re into – mosaics, stained glass, glass fusing, or glass jewelry – Delphi always has the tools you need to be creative. Without your tools, it would be impossible to bring to life all the incredible ideas that you dream up. As our 26th Annual Art Glass Festival quickly approaches, we know our glass artists are busy fusing, firing, and cutting to create their best pieces ever by using their favorite tools. So what are your favorite tools? Let’s explore some of our most popular tools. Toyo Dry Wheel Supercutter Everyone loves this oil-free cutter because it’s easy to use and makes great cuts without all the clean-up. Plus, it’s very durable and the cutter head is replaceable, making this tool a prime choice for glass artists. Creators Premium Bottle Cutter Glass artists that love to upcycle love this tool that makes cutting bottles

Creating Positives: Making Space and Time for Your Glass Art Projects

Creating Positives: Making Space and Time for Your Glass Art Projects At Delphi Glass, we firmly believe that glass art does us all so much good. From fueling our creativity to busting stress, it’s a necessary action that we must make both time and space for. Most people start off making glass art as a hobby before they decide it’s what they want to do as their life’s work. Even if you don’t pursue glass art as a profession though, it’s still wise to invest the time and space needed to unleash your creative potential. To find creative space to work in even in the smallest quarters. A seldom-used coat closet can easily be converted into an amazing workspace. You don’t need a huge workshop in order to bring your creativity to life with glass art. Even a small space devoted to creating will have a big impact on your happiness and health. Delphi Glass has all the tools and

Feeling Blue: Getting to Know Artist Maggi Blue

Feeling Blue: Getting to Know Artist Maggi Blue How did you get started in fused glass art? It seems that fused glass is really just one step in a progression of mediums that started while I was dabbling in ceramics. I am not formally trained in fine arts (I was a fine arts major for my freshman year in college before the fear of failure set in and I switched to communications) so all my art training has been personally pursued. A number of years later, I must have happened across a warm glass site or a book and the deal was sealed. I did a Craigslist search the next week and immediately found someone in Bangor looking to sell her glass fusing studio for $400. Everything I needed to get startedkiln, glass, gloves, shelf paper etc. It was almost eerie how easily I happened across exactly what I was looking for - especially in Midcoast Maine (which

Craig Mitchell Smith: Developing His Own Style

Craig Mitchell Smith: Developing His Own Style How did you get started in glass? I got started in glass by taking a glass class at Delphi in the winter of 2005. I was hooked. I just couldnt stop, I was making glass with a friend who had a ceramic kiln when HGTV offered to come film my work in glass. I had nine weeks to prepare, and I went to Delphi and bought a coffin kiln and glass and went to work, making pieces that made sense for my garden. Only after the segment aired, and galleries started calling offering representation did I consider glass as a career. Now I have had 26 gallery shows, three museum showings and three large public garden exhibitions. I just opened my own gallery. You mentioned in the biography on your website that you have done painting, interior design, set design and floral design. How have these activities influenced your work

DIY To the Rescue: How to Make a Frit Piston

DIY To the Rescue: How to Make a Frit Piston As a self-described cheap glass artisan who lives in rural Maine,finding or making the tools I need myself (rather than buying them online and having them shipped) is a must. As a total beginner, I found that making frit with my scrap glass was actually messier and more dangerous than I had originally suspected. Hammering away on my back deck proved to be a situation which resulted in wasted scrap glass...and tons of cuts.I finally admitted finding a proper tool to make my own frit was a necessity (to my deck AND my hands) - but $50 (plus shipping) for a Frit Piston was just not in my budget. So I took an hour to roam the Home Depot (which, yes, even in rural Maine you will find one) for ideas on how to hack my own solution. What I came up with, after wandering the isles for an

Donna Sarafis: Basics of Fusing Part 2

Donna Sarafis: Basics of Fusing Part 2 Part 2 of a 2 part series on the basics of glass fusing. In this weeks article Donna gives advice on indispensable tools for beginner glass fusers. In the beginning, I used one larger tool, and that was a Super Star Grinder. It is still running, running, running. Others have come, and some have gone, but this one is still here. For smaller cold working projects, diamond hand pads do a nice job. The next cutting tool that I bought was a saw. My Taurus 3 Ring Saw has worked extremely well for me, and I love what I can do with it that I couldnt do before, but I worked for 2 years before I purchased this nifty item. As for cutters and breakers, I have many, but for me, the Silberschnitt breaker pliers are a must for small (1/4) strip breaking.....saves so much glass. I use both

Simple Solutions to Glass Art Pet Peeves

Simple Solutions to Glass Art Pet Peeves Here at Delphi, we love a good reason to celebrate. With the Holiday Season still looming weeks away, we were feeling anxious for a bit of excitement now. The good news? There are lots of lesser known holidays scattered throughout the year if you only look for them. (September includes a favorite of ours; National Talk Like a Pirate Day.) We needed another zany mood boost to get us through Thats how we found this gem Its National Pet Peeve Week. In honor of this holiday we thought long and hard about what really gets under our skin and pushes our buttons while working on projects. Check out our top glass art pet peeves, and the simple solutions sure to put a smile back on your face. Pet Peeve Disappearing Marker Lines Solution Mark Stay II saves the day. Just wipe

Road Trip! Here Are the Best Museums to Visit for Glass Art

Road Trip! Here Are the Best Museums to Visit for Glass Art Header image courtesy of Chihuly Collection - St. Petersburg, Florida As glass artists, fueling our own imagination comes from being inspired by the creativity of others. Observing the beauty of glass art pieces that have been unleashed from another artist’s dreams, means we are that much closer to displaying our own for the world to see. Visiting museums with glass art displays can give us more insight into what we can skillfully create and drive our dreams of becoming beloved artists. It can also be a beautiful way to spend a day. Here are some of the best museums in America to view stunning glass art collections and become inspired. Macklowe Gallery – New York, New York You don’t need to travel the world to see the very best glass art because this gallery displays some of the finest pieces from all over the globe. You’ll find Tiffany lamps and

Learn from the Best- Spring 2015 Delphi Guest Instructors

Learn from the Best- Spring 2015 Delphi Guest Instructors The Spring 2015 session of art glass classes at Delphis Creativity Center in Lansing, MI is all set to start. This season renowned glass artists Cathy Claycomb and Margaret Zinser join Tim Drier and Carol Shelkin to help expand the scope of your glassworking skills. Get to know each artist and their work, then see which class is right for you. Class sizes are limited so register now to ensure your opportunity to work with these amazing artists. Tim Drier Tim Drier has been a glassblower for 25 years, and applies his scientific glassblowing expertise to artistic flameworking. He concentrates on creating decanters, goblets, vases, and human sculptural forms. Drier has taught flameworking courses at The Studio and the Pittsburgh Glass Center, and has demonstrated at the International Flameworkers Conference at Salem Community College. Check out Tims work on his Corning Museum of Glass page or