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Ribbon Machine Replaces Glassblowers

Ribbon Machine Replaces Glassblowers Last weekend, while killing time in Detroit before a flight, I wandered into the Henry Ford Museum. If you havent had a chance to visit this monstrous attraction, make plans now. Its incredible. I was there for three hours and saw only a small portion of what the museum has to offer. There are huge machinery collections, transportation exhibits and much, much more planes, trains and automobiles, oh my. I was especially intrigued with one particular machine. The Corning Glass Ribbon Machine. Before the invention of this machine, every light bulb was hand blown. As you can imagine, this process was painstakingly slow and expensive. But then a man named Will Woods came along and changed the world. This is his story. In 1898, Will Woods was a 19-year-old kid looking to pursue his dream of becoming a glassblower. He traveled to the Corning Glass Manufactory in Corning, NY

The Correct Way to Mitre Lead for Diamonds

The Correct Way to Mitre Lead for Diamonds Can you please tell me the correct way to mitre the lead for diamonds? Diamonds can be tricky. This diagram shows the way we would go about cutting the lead for a diamond. We find the easiest way to decide where to mitre the lead is by drawing lines on the diamond connecting the opposite points. Then, put a piece of lead on the glass and extend that line onto the lead. Now remove the lead and cut it where you marked. Replace it on the glass, lining it up where it belongs and mark the other end of that piece of lead. Cut it, replace it, and continue until all of the pieces of lead are cut. Reprinted with permission from Stained Glass News. All rights reserved.

Using Finger Fids for Foiling

Using Finger Fids for Foiling Foiling and crimping. Most glass people either hate it or love it. Its one of those jobs that just has to get done one way or the other. Foiling glass is a no brainer, and the technique can be mastered in a matter of minutes, but crimpingwell , lets just say that it has its variations. One method that I picked up from the productions shop I first worked in has always proved to be the quickest and most efficient Finger fids. Whats a finger fid? What youll need 1. Masking tape 2. Your fingers Step One Extend the thumb, index and middle fingers of the hand you usually crimp your foil with; or if you use a fid, the hand you usually hold your fid with. Step Two Cut about ten short strips of masking tape approximately 3 long. Step Three Beginning with any one of your fingers, wrap

Grind Glass Without a Glass Grinder

Grind Glass Without a Glass Grinder I love my glass grinder. In fact, I have a couple of them. But I dont grind every piece of glass that I cut. For me, its not necessary. If you can cut accurately, and by accurately I mean no bigger or smaller than your pattern, you may be able to cut down on your projects time by trying out a tool that Ive come to love and rely upon, my grinding stone. A grinding stone, or abrasive stone harks to an earlier day in the history of glass cutting, but still has its value when used in conjunction with good solid, glass scoring and breaking technique. In the pre-grinder days, these stones were de rigueur for the well equipped glazier and to put it simply, they got the job done. Learning to use the stone will take about thirty seconds of training; implementing it can save you hours.

Cutting Essentials: Get a Perfect Score Every Time with these Super Cutters!

Cutting Essentials: Get a Perfect Score Every Time with these Super Cutters! Saws are great for cutting glass, but sometimes, it’s a more precise cut we need for an obscurely-shaped piece. When you want to make circles with glass or cut out unusual shapes for your stained glass project, what should you use? Many glass artists loathe cutting circles because it is so difficult to make it just right. Fortunately, you don’t need to scrap any glass project that contains circles anymore because the Silberschnitt Pro Circle Cutter is just what you need. This German-engineered product uses a strong suction cup to hold onto the glass. You’ll need to make sure the glass is stationary on your cutting area so that it doesn’t move. Then you can set the Silberschnitt Pro Circle Cutter to the width of your desires. To make that perfect circle, you’ll need to apply continuous pressure as you cut. The 6-wheel cutting turret is designed to make flawless

Holiday Gift Ideas for the Stained Glass Artist

Holiday Gift Ideas for the Stained Glass Artist There are only 52 days left until Christmas. Have you started your holiday shopping yet? If not, Delphi has you covered with some bright and shiny ideas for the stained glass artist in your life. Here are some we think will be very well received if you tuck them under your tree. 1. Stained Glass A stained glass artist can never have too much glass to work with. We carry a huge selection of stained glass. Why not order some new and exciting colors for your favorite stained glass artist? Try something different like the Van Gogh glass that is almost too pretty to cut. Plus with glass packs and sample sets, your recipient will get a gorgeous array of glass to work with in one fabulous package. 2. Studio Pro Caddy If you’re stained glass artist has tools all over the place in their studio, perhaps a Studio Pro

Holiday Gift Ideas for the Stained Glass Artist

Holiday Gift Ideas for the Stained Glass Artist There are only 52 days left until Christmas. Have you started your holiday shopping yet? If not, Delphi has you covered with some bright and shiny ideas for the stained glass artist in your life. Here are some we think will be very well received if you tuck them under your tree. 1. Stained Glass A stained glass artist can never have too much glass to work with. We carry a huge selection of stained glass. Why not order some new and exciting colors for your favorite stained glass artist? Try something different like the Van Gogh glass that is almost too pretty to cut. Plus with glass packs and sample sets, your recipient will get a gorgeous array of glass to work with in one fabulous package. 2. Studio Pro Caddy If you’re stained glass artist has tools all over the place in their studio, perhaps a Studio Pro

What Are Your Favorite Tools?

What Are Your Favorite Tools? No matter what you’re into – mosaics, stained glass, glass fusing, or glass jewelry – Delphi always has the tools you need to be creative. Without your tools, it would be impossible to bring to life all the incredible ideas that you dream up. As our 26th Annual Art Glass Festival quickly approaches, we know our glass artists are busy fusing, firing, and cutting to create their best pieces ever by using their favorite tools. So what are your favorite tools? Let’s explore some of our most popular tools. Toyo Dry Wheel Supercutter Everyone loves this oil-free cutter because it’s easy to use and makes great cuts without all the clean-up. Plus, it’s very durable and the cutter head is replaceable, making this tool a prime choice for glass artists. Creators Premium Bottle Cutter Glass artists that love to upcycle love this tool that makes cutting bottles

Observing a Kiln During Firing: What's Normal?

Observing a Kiln During Firing: What's Normal? Why does my kiln make a buzzing sound? Here are some of the sounds that a kiln makes The heating elements hum when they turn on.That is because they vibrate in the brick grooves due to magnetism between the coils. This sound is normal. It diminishes as the kiln gets hotter, because the elements soften. The clicking noise of a switch-operated kiln is also normal.It is the sound of an infinite control switch cycling on and off. When the clicking turns into a popping noise, the switch is probably about to fail. You should keep a spare on hand. Relays are another source of clicking.To turn on the elements, a digital controller sends twelve volts to the relays. The relays, in turn, act as switches and send full voltage to the elements. The relays click every time they turn on. A chattering noise, however, indicates that a relay is about

Delphi Featured Artist: Stephanie Murphy

Delphi Featured Artist: Stephanie Murphy Each month at Delphi Glass, we’d like to put the spotlight on one of the many talented artists we see daily in our Artist Gallery. For the month of February, we’re delighted to introduce Stephanie Murphy, who goes by the name aMosaicist in our gallery. Stephanie was born and raised in Palmerton, Pennsylvania, and now lives just south of there in a town called Schnecksville. After earning her nursing degree in college, she became a critical care nurse for 10 years. But in order to care for her autistic son, Patrick, she had to leave her career behind. Throughout college and beyond, Stephanie began using art as a coping mechanism for the stresses in her life, especially when it came to raising her autistic son. “In college, I filled my electives with art classes, drawing and ceramics, to give my brain a respite from the vigorous nursing courses. Creating art

Fused Stained Glass Pendant

Fused Stained Glass Pendant Sometimes necessity is the mother of invention, and sometimes invention comes when you have nothing to lose. Early in my career, I had three metal-clay-and-fused-glass pendants fail in a single day. The glass cabochons simply shattered and fell away from the silver after the pieces were fired because I had neglected to cut an expansion hole underneath the cabochons. Augghh. Lesson learned. But now I was left with three ugly pieces of silver, each with small pieces of glass permanently fused into bizarre locations on the surfacea loss I could not afford. Weeks later, after tryingunsuccessfully to remove the glass, I decided to try fusing glass in patterns onto the surface of the pendants. The results were surprising, and the Stained Glass process was born This technique begins with any fired metal clay with a flat surface. Small shards of fusible glass are then attached to the silver. After