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Award-winning Video Spotlights Hilltop Artists

Award-winning Video Spotlights Hilltop Artists Its very rare that a video stops me in my tracks. But when a colleague sent me Hilltop Artists Black Forest Ham video, I was hooked for the entire 7 min. and 58 seconds. If you havent heard of Hilltop Artists, its an organization that reaches out to at-risk teens and teaches them the art of fusing, flameworking, mosaics and glass blowing. More importantly, it gives kids a sense of self-worth and an outlet for pent-up frustration. With the help of Dale Chihuly, Hilltop Artists, a 501(c)3 non-profit glass arts program, opened in 1994. It provides classes and individualized instruction for more than 500 students each year, and no students are refused based on past behavior, grades, disabilities, or artistic talent. This video won a Telly award back in June for being one of the finest video productions created for the web. I encourage you to watch it and find

Glass Cutters: Self-lubricating Glass Cutters

Do you have self-lubricating glass cutters available in your catalog? I have searched the Buffalo area for this tool and cannot locate one. Can you help? We do carry glass cutters that have handles that can be filled with oil. These cutters have a wick in the opening between the handle and the cutting head which draws the oil and lubricates the wheel. There is a drawback to filling the handles with oil, though. Its a messy process and the handles have a tendency to leak. I personally recommend that you keep a small jar (like a baby food jar) with a cotton ball or folded pieces of paper towel in the bottom that is saturated with cutting oil. The cutting wheel can be run over this when you feel it needs to be lubricated. Also, store your cutter

Stained Glass Stylists, NJ

Stained Glass Stylists, NJ Stained Glass Stylists of Waretown, New Jersey has become a haven for would-be artists as well as experienced artisans. Theyve been around for 14 years now, and owners Butch and Jane Gathright say theyre not going anywhere. Butch started in stained glass almost 25 years ago. There was no one to teach me how to do the craft so I became self-taught, he said. Having endured the hardships of learning on his own, he made it his mission to help others learn the craft. Over the years Ive seen many people go from having never touched a piece of glass to opening their own businesses, he said. Stained Glass Stylists offers classes in stained glass, kiln-formed glass and more. They also sell a variety of supplies in-store and online. In addition, they specialize in repairs and custom work. For more information visit their website or find them on Facebook

The Importance of Packaging

The Importance of Packaging We tell ourselves not to judge a book by its cover, but the simple truth is, we are attracted to whats attractive. On a recent hunt for a birthday present for my mother, I came across several beautiful handbags in several different boutiques. What ultimately influenced my final purchase decision was the complimentary gift-wrapping offered by one of the storeowners. The handbag itself wasnt any prettier or better quality than the others I was considering, but the packaging was beautiful. Brightly colored tissue, a big sturdy box, quality wrapping paper and an oversized hand-tied bow. No, it wasnt sealed with a kiss, rather a large gold embossed sticker with the boutique name and logo (theres nothing wrong with a little discreet self-promotion). Here are a few tips for better packaging-it might just buy you your next customer. 1. Show your customers what theyll get. The boutique I mentioned earlier had

Cutting Essentials: Get a Perfect Score Every Time with these Super Cutters!

Cutting Essentials: Get a Perfect Score Every Time with these Super Cutters! Saws are great for cutting glass, but sometimes, it’s a more precise cut we need for an obscurely-shaped piece. When you want to make circles with glass or cut out unusual shapes for your stained glass project, what should you use? Many glass artists loathe cutting circles because it is so difficult to make it just right. Fortunately, you don’t need to scrap any glass project that contains circles anymore because the Silberschnitt Pro Circle Cutter is just what you need. This German-engineered product uses a strong suction cup to hold onto the glass. You’ll need to make sure the glass is stationary on your cutting area so that it doesn’t move. Then you can set the Silberschnitt Pro Circle Cutter to the width of your desires. To make that perfect circle, you’ll need to apply continuous pressure as you cut. The 6-wheel cutting turret is designed to make flawless

Holiday Villages: Create Your Own Iconic Set with Holiday Village Molds

Holiday Villages: Create Your Own Iconic Set with Holiday Village Molds When it comes to the holidays, creating traditions is the best way to be creative. Traditions are certainly steeped in history, but every family has their own unique take on it, making it all the more special and beautiful. At Delphi Glass, we introduced our iconic series of Holiday Village Molds back in 2015. We modeled them after the stunning and charming town of Harbor Springs, Michigan, a very historic place with quaint architecture that can still be seen in the quiet streets there. It makes for the perfect setting of a Christmas Village that you can create from cast glass. Even though it comes as a mold, you can customize it the way you want it. The little details can have your own exclusive touch to them. Choose the colors you like and even try different finishes in the same mold. You can also give it a

Mark Hall: Leaving His Mark on the Glass World

Mark Hall: Leaving His Mark on the Glass World We recently asked our Facebook fans to send us photos of glass art from their gardens. We received some especially interesting photos from glass artist Mark Hall. Impressed as we were, we realized that Marks talent goes far beyond the confines of his garden. He is self-taught and has mastered German leading techniques, hand beveling, mirroring and sandblasting among other techniques. He fine-tuned hisskills while studying abroad in Germany at Derix Glass Studio,at Pilchuck School of Glass in Washington, andwith The Studio at the Corning Museum of Glass in New York. He and his wife, Leslie, now work together at Hallmark Glass. How did you get started in glass? In 1976 my brother informed me hed started a business, and I was his partner. Surprised, I asked, Whats our business? He responded, Stained glass. I knew nothing about it, so I learned how to make a window on our first

DIY To the Rescue: How to Make a Frit Piston

DIY To the Rescue: How to Make a Frit Piston As a self-described cheap glass artisan who lives in rural Maine,finding or making the tools I need myself (rather than buying them online and having them shipped) is a must. As a total beginner, I found that making frit with my scrap glass was actually messier and more dangerous than I had originally suspected. Hammering away on my back deck proved to be a situation which resulted in wasted scrap glass...and tons of cuts.I finally admitted finding a proper tool to make my own frit was a necessity (to my deck AND my hands) - but $50 (plus shipping) for a Frit Piston was just not in my budget. So I took an hour to roam the Home Depot (which, yes, even in rural Maine you will find one) for ideas on how to hack my own solution. What I came up with, after wandering the isles for an

Featured Artist: Kexin Wen

Featured Artist: Kexin Wen When and how did you get started in stained glass? Ive been interested in stained glass for as long as I can remember. As a child, I would sit in churches and watch the (often) biblical depictions come to life when a stray ray of sunlight cast its illumination our way. Sun shadows dancing. I dabbled in many media over the years, trying to find an outlet for some of the visions careening inside, but none of them took. Drawing, painting - even watercolours - no amount of professional training could guide my hand in a satisfactory way. But then there was the glass. I lived abroad for a few years, and wound my way through Europe on my way back to the States when I finished my Peace Corps Service. My last international destination was Paris, where one of my closest friends lives as an organist. Two beautiful autumn

Bedazzled Earrings: A Microwave Fusing Project

Bedazzled Earrings: A Microwave Fusing Project By Rita Levine Skill Level 2 (Adult 1-5 1 being the easiest, 5 being most difficult) Time to Complete 45 Minutes Materials Fuseworks Kiln Fuseworks Kiln Paper Fuseworks Glass Cutter Wheeled Glass Nippers Ruler Westrim pearl assortment Sterling Silver Plated Square Cabochon Mini Links - Delphi 85435 2 hat pins Earring wires Scrap fusing glass 90 COE Chain-nose pliers Round-nose pliers Instructions 1. Place white glass on a clean flat cutting surface with the smooth side of the glass facing towards you. 2. Start on an edge of the glass holding the cutter firmly in one hand. Keep the cutter perpendicular to the glass. Push the cutter gently and evenly across the glass. Decrease pressure slightly as you reach the opposite edge of the glass; lift the cutter off the glass at the end. 3. Breaking the score line can be done with breaking pliers. Hold the glass in

Feeling Blue: Getting to Know Artist Maggi Blue

Feeling Blue: Getting to Know Artist Maggi Blue How did you get started in fused glass art? It seems that fused glass is really just one step in a progression of mediums that started while I was dabbling in ceramics. I am not formally trained in fine arts (I was a fine arts major for my freshman year in college before the fear of failure set in and I switched to communications) so all my art training has been personally pursued. A number of years later, I must have happened across a warm glass site or a book and the deal was sealed. I did a Craigslist search the next week and immediately found someone in Bangor looking to sell her glass fusing studio for $400. Everything I needed to get startedkiln, glass, gloves, shelf paper etc. It was almost eerie how easily I happened across exactly what I was looking for - especially in Midcoast Maine (which

Spring Color Trends for 2011

Spring Color Trends for 2011 Global Overview of Colors Theme The spectrum of color for 2011-2012 is wide and diverse. These colors are rich saturated hues. They evoke a sense of intensity and culture. They are cheery and, in most cases, bright. Follow your own inspiration. Break a color rule or mix palettes. Remember, color is personal and can infuse vibrant emotion. Influences Brighter colors may lift our spirits during these uncertain economic times and create a sense of optimism for the future. The palette is bright but not radical. With an eye turned towards revitalizing the economy, colors, like our thoughts about the future, are slightly more reserved, said Kate Smith of Sensational Color. Applications Color allows us to change our environment quickly, and most times, with little effort and little expense. Choosing a new wall color and adding lighting, hard or soft accessories (table top or pillows as examples) floor or window treatments

Fused Glass Paintings by Lula Torgersen

Fused Glass Paintings by Lula Torgersen How did you get started in glass? Glass is a fascinating medium. I was living as an ex-pat in Denmark in 2001 when I had the luck of finding a fusing glass course. I fell in love with the technique immediately. I pursued further classes and a masters since, trying to achieve more. Im also a self learner, I love to study and work on my own. Since then I never stopped looking for ways to improve myself in this beautiful art. Why glass? The first time I went to Murano, Italy, back in 1986 I had the chance to visit glass studios and was astonished by the way the artists worked with the powders and heat. Due to its unique properties, glass continues to be an intriguing material that can reflect, transmit or absorb light. It creates a surprise element which brings eclectic interest to a space without

Creating Wellness through Glass Art

Creating Wellness through Glass Art Photo credit Green Earth Glass We all know that making something beautiful feels good, but did you know that there are health perks too? It’s true. The creative process of planning your projects while overcoming the obstacles you face when bringing your glass art ideas to life is stimulating for the brain on so many levels. While it may be challenging to try a new technique or even a new form of glass art, the entire process is actually more relaxing for your brain than you think, all the while stimulating it for growth. The end result is a gorgeous piece of glass art and a refreshed mind. You really need to do this for yourself to bring more peace and harmony into your world. At Delphi Glass, we completely agree with this which is why we offer our classes year-round. Sign up for one of them to

9 Amazing Father's Day Tributes

9 Amazing Father's Day Tributes My dad retired and wasnt enjoying the change of pace so I suggested he get back into an old hobby (stained glass) by coming to work with me here at Delphi. He joined the customer service department and brought technical expertise and a passion for customer care that always made me proud to have him here. Along the way, he also got back into stained glass, and picked up an interest in mosaics, fusing and cold-working. Hes since retired again, but cant quite seem to give up his love of tools and customers and finds his way back to Delphi as a photographer during our annual Art Glass Festival event, and as an assistant instructor with Guest Instructor Kent Lauer every year. The photo (at right) was taken by Melanie Churchill during the 2010 AGF reception while dad and I were both cruising the crowd with our cameras. - Karina

Learn from the Best- Spring 2015 Delphi Guest Instructors

Learn from the Best- Spring 2015 Delphi Guest Instructors The Spring 2015 session of art glass classes at Delphis Creativity Center in Lansing, MI is all set to start. This season renowned glass artists Cathy Claycomb and Margaret Zinser join Tim Drier and Carol Shelkin to help expand the scope of your glassworking skills. Get to know each artist and their work, then see which class is right for you. Class sizes are limited so register now to ensure your opportunity to work with these amazing artists. Tim Drier Tim Drier has been a glassblower for 25 years, and applies his scientific glassblowing expertise to artistic flameworking. He concentrates on creating decanters, goblets, vases, and human sculptural forms. Drier has taught flameworking courses at The Studio and the Pittsburgh Glass Center, and has demonstrated at the International Flameworkers Conference at Salem Community College. Check out Tims work on his Corning Museum of Glass page or