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Is It Safe to Use Fused Glass for Dinnerware?

Is It Safe to Use Fused Glass for Dinnerware? The official answer from the glass manufacturers is, All tested compatible glasses have been tested by the FDA for food bearing surfaces and were determined to be suitable.However, if you add other processes or compounds to the items, for example paint, stains, decals, glazes, etc. it is important to check that these items are also approved for food bearing surfaces. In addition it is of the utmost importance that dinnerware items be properly annealed, especially if youre going to place hot food on them - the thermal shock could cause a break in poorly annealed items. This Randys ProTip brought to you from the book Introduction to Glass Fusing by Petra Kaiser. VisitWardell Publications. Also, at Delphi we take food safety and dinnerware very seriously. We always recommend that certain glasses are capped with clear. These are usually irids, dichro and glass with texture, since these can also trap

Featured Artist: Kerry Collett

Featured Artist: Kerry Collett How and when did you get started in glass art? I saw an article about Kristin Frantzen-Orr along with a step by step example of how to do one of her famous floral beads. I talked about it so much my husband bought me a beginning torch set for the following Christmas. Once I got the kiln and the duel fuel torch, I just kept experimenting and growing from there. Kristin is still my idol and I keep telling myself that one day I will do nice, clean floral beads like hers. Your jewelry, vases, plates etc. are all beautiful. I especially love the geologic nature of your Copper Reactive dish, its so unique. Can you tell us a little about how you achieved that look? The base glass is Bullseye Steel Blue Opal (000146) and it reacts all on its own. I used clear stringers and broke up chunks

How to Make Your Own Blown Glass Ornaments

How to Make Your Own Blown Glass Ornaments GLASKOLBEN cylinders are pre-blown clear glass cylinders with blow pipe ends, used for blowing glass balls. Glaskolben cylinders are used throughout Europe for making Christmas tree ornaments. Glaskolben is a German word that translates to glass bulb. WATCHAVIDEOONBLOWINGGLASKOLBENORNAMENTS. SUPPLIES/EQUIPMENT Torch head for Mapp Gas use Gas/oxygen torch Glaskolben™ cylinder 90 COE frits and powders for decoration Ornament cap and loop set (available in gold or silver) COMPATIBILITY Glaskolben is compatible with Uroboros and Bullseye 90 COE glass frit and powders. Do not use any other COE as it may cause stress or fracture. HOWTOBLOWANORNAMENT 1. Light the torch and adjust the flame - a broader flame is better. Select a Sealed End Cylinder Glaskolben™ and introduce it into the back of the flame away from the torch. Rotate it as it is brought into the hotter area of the flame. Continue to rotate until the cylinder is glowing

How to: Create Faux Opals with Glass

How to: Create Faux Opals with Glass Before I was fortunate enough to own a kiln, I used to experiment with all kinds of polymer clay using recipes for faux gemstones. It was fun and inexpensive. While giving a fused glass lesson the other day, I said, Hey, lets try to make some faux opals. So, we crushed up some green and orange, clear backed dichroic glass (from the Uroboros Magic Box), and mixed in a tiny bit of crushed opaque white glass. We cut two transparent ovals, covered them with Bullseye Glastac Firing Glue, and sprinkled on the frit. We added another layer of glue and piled up some more frit. The beauty of this glue is that you can use as much as you want. I love it for holding the frit on the edges of bowls and glass. The fired pieces looked like opal cabochons. To make the cabochons more opaque, I used my

Fused Stained Glass Pendant

Fused Stained Glass Pendant Sometimes necessity is the mother of invention, and sometimes invention comes when you have nothing to lose. Early in my career, I had three metal-clay-and-fused-glass pendants fail in a single day. The glass cabochons simply shattered and fell away from the silver after the pieces were fired because I had neglected to cut an expansion hole underneath the cabochons. Augghh. Lesson learned. But now I was left with three ugly pieces of silver, each with small pieces of glass permanently fused into bizarre locations on the surfacea loss I could not afford. Weeks later, after tryingunsuccessfully to remove the glass, I decided to try fusing glass in patterns onto the surface of the pendants. The results were surprising, and the Stained Glass process was born This technique begins with any fired metal clay with a flat surface. Small shards of fusible glass are then attached to the silver. After