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Bullseye Thinfire Shelf Paper to the Skin's Rescue

Bullseye Thinfire Shelf Paper to the Skin's Rescue As a fused glass jewelry artisan I have probably spent as much time on the look and feel of the backs of my pieces as the fronts. I have found that the feel of the glass on the skin is as much a selling point as the colors or design. Its the same conundrum fiber artists have been dealing with for ages wool is an amazing fiber - easy to knit with and warm - but the majority of folks just cant stand that itchy feeling on bare skin. The same principle applies to glass. What you use on your kiln shelf can determine exactly how your pieces will feel on the skin - and in turn, can make for a happier customer. After experimenting with various methods including kiln wash (produces a very rough feel) and thicker fiber papers/boards (again, too rough) I have settled down into a

Get the Exact Glass You Need with the Glass Finder Tool at Delphi Glass

Get the Exact Glass You Need with the Glass Finder Tool at Delphi Glass You probably already know that Delphi Glass has an amazing selection of glass to buy for your glass art projects. From stained glass to mosaics to fused glass and beyond, you’ll find everything you need here. But sometimes, your projects will require specific colors, transparencies and thicknesses. Or perhaps you’re just brand loyal and want to buy glass manufactured by Bullseye, Spectrum, Van Gogh, or others. Whatever the case, you can minimize your sleuthing for just the right glass by using the Delphi Glass Glass Finder Tool. The dropdown menu selections make it easy to choose exactly what you want so you can place your order faster. Find your fusing COE in seconds. New to glass art and not sure what that means? It’s the Coefficient of Expansion that measures the rate of how that glass will expand and contract when it is heated or cooled. You need

Fused Stained Glass Pendant

Fused Stained Glass Pendant Sometimes necessity is the mother of invention, and sometimes invention comes when you have nothing to lose. Early in my career, I had three metal-clay-and-fused-glass pendants fail in a single day. The glass cabochons simply shattered and fell away from the silver after the pieces were fired because I had neglected to cut an expansion hole underneath the cabochons. Augghh. Lesson learned. But now I was left with three ugly pieces of silver, each with small pieces of glass permanently fused into bizarre locations on the surfacea loss I could not afford. Weeks later, after tryingunsuccessfully to remove the glass, I decided to try fusing glass in patterns onto the surface of the pendants. The results were surprising, and the Stained Glass process was born This technique begins with any fired metal clay with a flat surface. Small shards of fusible glass are then attached to the silver. After