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How to Make a Wind Chime Using Recycled Wine Bottles

How to Make a Wind Chime Using Recycled Wine Bottles This is the perfect time of year to spend some time outside. If you enjoy your garden and outdoor spaces, try making some fun wind chimes with your old wine bottles. Wine bottles are very sturdy, they will last a long time in the elements. The echo of sunlight through the glass is beautiful. You can use a single color of wine bottle in your chimes or mix it up with blue, clear or green. Add beads and some wire or colorful string to dress them up a bit. Try your hand at creating your own garden art and enjoy the music. This video tutorial explains how to make these beautiful wind chimes. Post and video courtesy of Cindy Shepard and Design Originals. For more great bottle art ideas, check out the Bottle Art book.

Combining Fabric or Paper with Your Glass

Combining Fabric or Paper with Your Glass Did you know that you can sandwich fabric (or paper) between glass just like you do with pressed flowers? It sure opens up a lot of possibilities for creating one-of-a-kind projects. Heres how 1 Cut two pieces of thin clear glass (ideally, single strength or thinner) to match your pattern piece. Dull the edges of each piece, if necessary, with a fine grinder bit or scythe stone. 2 Carefully clean the surfaces of these pieces that will be on the inside of the sandwich. Once you have sandwiched the fabric inside the glass, you wont be able to clean the glass again. 3 Cut a piece of fabric to match the glass pieces you cut. 4 To create your sandwich, place the fabric on the bottom piece of glass (clean side up). Add the top piece of glass (clean side down). Now hold your sandwich together with a couple of

Explosions of Colour by Mollie Barrow

Explosions of Colour by Mollie Barrow We found Mollie Barrow on Facebook in the midst of a discussion on Pot Melts. Mollie cooks up her incredible glass creations in a quiet eco-village in rural Ireland with her 10-year old son Elliot and cats Bonnie and Oscar. She is continually inspired by the Northern Lights, and the rich swirls of color in her pieces prove it. We were blown away by her magical melts, and we know you will be too. How did you get started in glass? Ive been in love with glass art since I visited the Murano Glass Factory in Venice when I was 16. I was hypnotised by the skill and speed those guys had working with molten glass, and I would have loved to pursue glass seriously from then. As is often the case, however, life had other plans and it wasnt until I was in my late 20s that I

Fused Stained Glass Pendant

Fused Stained Glass Pendant Sometimes necessity is the mother of invention, and sometimes invention comes when you have nothing to lose. Early in my career, I had three metal-clay-and-fused-glass pendants fail in a single day. The glass cabochons simply shattered and fell away from the silver after the pieces were fired because I had neglected to cut an expansion hole underneath the cabochons. Augghh. Lesson learned. But now I was left with three ugly pieces of silver, each with small pieces of glass permanently fused into bizarre locations on the surfacea loss I could not afford. Weeks later, after tryingunsuccessfully to remove the glass, I decided to try fusing glass in patterns onto the surface of the pendants. The results were surprising, and the Stained Glass process was born This technique begins with any fired metal clay with a flat surface. Small shards of fusible glass are then attached to the silver. After