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How to Choose the Right Copper Foil for Your Works of Art

How to Choose the Right Copper Foil for Your Works of Art When creating stained glass art, the size and type of foil can be tricky. For newcomers to this type of glass art, many questions arise as to which copper foil is the right one to use. Fortunately, Delphi Glass has some handy tips to help you make the right choice every time. 1. Foil width You might be inclined to select foil that creates skinny lines, however they are not as strong. That’s because you can’t apply as much solder. For most projects, you’ll find 7/32” copper foil will be suitable, however if you vary the width of the foil it will add more depth. If you’re using thicker glass, 1/4" foil will create a seam of normal width. But if you want special effects, take a razor knife and trim the copper foil after you apply it to the glass. Creating distance in your piece can be done

What is Tinning?

What is Tinning? In my reading I keep seeing mentions of tinning. What is it, and how do I do it? Tinning is the term used to describe the action of putting a thin coat of solder over something else, for instance copper foil, a brass vase cap, or a soldering iron tip. One reason may be to protect the metal from the air, which is usually in reference to a soldering iron tip. The other purpose may be to color the metal underneath, which we’ll address here. You may have seen it suggested that you tin all exposed copper foil on the surface of a panel before running a solder bead. (You will need to apply flux before tinning and again before running the bead.) Some people feel that this allows them to run the final bead more easily because all of the foil edges are already covered. Other people prefer to

Dimensional Glass Art Making a Comeback

Dimensional Glass Art Making a Comeback Dimensional or 3-D relief in glass art is making a very strong comeback for Fall 2010, and we predict it to be even stronger in 2011. Adding cast pieces will bring excitement and a novelty look to your work. The process is easy. When planning your project, consider elements of the design that could be made with glass castings. Once fired and cleaned, castings can be foiled and soldered into panels, lamps and lanterns, added to mosaics, or fired into fused art. Your finished project will have a sculptural look and will showcase your glass art abilities. The deer trophy stained glass panel by artist Teresa Batten is a wonderful example of 3-D castings. Each pinecone has a rich textured surface and adds realistic interpretation to the finished panel. The unique design not only captures the spirit of the piece but also invites the viewer to examine the work from

Working with Stained Glass on a Schedule

Working with Stained Glass on a Schedule My time is limited and I can only work in 2-4 hour intervals. Are there any preventative steps that I should take to assure that my work will be in good shape when I return? Many hobbyists find themselves in the same position, and this is a very good question. We cant cover every possible scenario, but hopefully we can help. Obviously, there are areas where it wont make any difference if you get interrupted. For instance, pattern prep, glass cutting, fitting, and grinding. However, if you do find that you need to stop in the middle of applying copper foil, youll need to think about how long it will be until you can resume the job. If it will only be a few days, there isnt anything special that youll need to do. But if it will be longer than that (or you live in a particularly humid area),

Dragonfly Garden Stake

Dragonfly Garden Stake Lately, Ive been spending a lot of time in my backyard. My father (a retired horticulture professor and perpetual gardener) has been preparing my quarter-acre lot for a vegetable garden. As soon as I saw this project guide, I could envision stained glass dragonflies peeking out amidst my beans and greens. They are perfect for adding a little sparkle to your summer landscape. DOWNLOAD THE PATTERN HERE Materials Wissmach Sky Blue and Crystal Stream X for Wings, 1/2 Sq. Ft. (or other glass color of choice) Wissmach Dark Blue/Medium Green Opal for Body, 1/3 Sq. Ft. (or other glass color of choice) Flux Solder 7/32 Copper Foil 20-, 22-, and 16-Gauge Copper Wire 2 Small Green Nuggets 1/8 Copper or Brass Rod Black Patina Directions This is one of many of the garden stake designs in Leslie Gibbs book, Garden Art in Glass. There is a lot more information

Holiday Gift Ideas for the Stained Glass Artist

Holiday Gift Ideas for the Stained Glass Artist There are only 52 days left until Christmas. Have you started your holiday shopping yet? If not, Delphi has you covered with some bright and shiny ideas for the stained glass artist in your life. Here are some we think will be very well received if you tuck them under your tree. 1. Stained Glass A stained glass artist can never have too much glass to work with. We carry a huge selection of stained glass. Why not order some new and exciting colors for your favorite stained glass artist? Try something different like the Van Gogh glass that is almost too pretty to cut. Plus with glass packs and sample sets, your recipient will get a gorgeous array of glass to work with in one fabulous package. 2. Studio Pro Caddy If you’re stained glass artist has tools all over the place in their studio, perhaps a Studio Pro

Holiday Gift Ideas for the Stained Glass Artist

Holiday Gift Ideas for the Stained Glass Artist There are only 52 days left until Christmas. Have you started your holiday shopping yet? If not, Delphi has you covered with some bright and shiny ideas for the stained glass artist in your life. Here are some we think will be very well received if you tuck them under your tree. 1. Stained Glass A stained glass artist can never have too much glass to work with. We carry a huge selection of stained glass. Why not order some new and exciting colors for your favorite stained glass artist? Try something different like the Van Gogh glass that is almost too pretty to cut. Plus with glass packs and sample sets, your recipient will get a gorgeous array of glass to work with in one fabulous package. 2. Studio Pro Caddy If you’re stained glass artist has tools all over the place in their studio, perhaps a Studio Pro

Regular Solder vs. Lead-Free Solder

Regular Solder vs. Lead-Free Solder I have some questions about Lead-Free Solder. Does it tarnish over time? Can you use patina on it? Does it flow like regular solder? Is it better than regular solder? We are sure that you arent the only one with these questions. Lets start with the question of whether or not its better than regular solder. Since the harm from lead is caused by ingestion, any project that will come in contact with food or food containers should be made with lead-free solder. In addition, anything that is handled, like jewelry or kaleidoscopes, should be made with lead-free solder. Hands have a terrible habit of making it into the mouth before they get washed. So, yes it is better than regular solder in these situations. As far as working with solder, you should be diligent about cleaning your hands after touching any solder. Dont eat, drink, smoke, or do anything

Learn from the Best- Spring 2015 Delphi Guest Instructors

Learn from the Best- Spring 2015 Delphi Guest Instructors The Spring 2015 session of art glass classes at Delphis Creativity Center in Lansing, MI is all set to start. This season renowned glass artists Cathy Claycomb and Margaret Zinser join Tim Drier and Carol Shelkin to help expand the scope of your glassworking skills. Get to know each artist and their work, then see which class is right for you. Class sizes are limited so register now to ensure your opportunity to work with these amazing artists. Tim Drier Tim Drier has been a glassblower for 25 years, and applies his scientific glassblowing expertise to artistic flameworking. He concentrates on creating decanters, goblets, vases, and human sculptural forms. Drier has taught flameworking courses at The Studio and the Pittsburgh Glass Center, and has demonstrated at the International Flameworkers Conference at Salem Community College. Check out Tims work on his Corning Museum of Glass page or