get started : front surface

Get Started

Getting started has never been easier. Select a category from the pull down or search for more information. This list is pulled from our Blog, Video, and Tips areas. Looking for products? Check out our Start-Up Kits.

How to Use Two Pieces of Mirror Back-To-Back

How to Use Two Pieces of Mirror Back-To-Back Can I use two pieces of mirror back to back in a window so it will look nice from both sides? Yes, you can. Like any pieces of mirror you use in a panel, youll want to use a sealant of some kind (ask your supplier for a recommendation) on the edges and back side of each piece before placing them back to back. The sealant is used to help prevent black rot a discoloring of the mirror caused when something nasty, most likely the flux, gets between the mirrored surface and the glass itself. The sealant is applied after youve cut and ground each piece of mirror to its final shape. Once the mirrors are cut and sealed, hold them back to back and wrap a wide foil (probably 3/8 if youre using 1/8 thick mirror) around the edge of both pieces together. You now have a piece thats

Connecting Your Torch to the Work Table

Connecting Your Torch to the Work Table Heres how to safely connect your torch to the work table. 1. Collect the hardware. Youll need an L-bracket, one or two large adjustable hose clamps (big enough to fit around the Map gas tank) and a C-clamp (if you dont want to screw into your work surface). 2. Attach the L bracket. Screw the bracket directly into the table on the surface. If you prefer not to screw directly into the table, you can use a C-clamp to secure the bracket. Make sure it is tight enough to keep the bracket from slipping. 3. Secure the tank with hose clamps. Place both large adjustable hose clamps behind the vertical leg of the L-bracket before screwing the L-bracket to the table front. Place the MAPP gas into the hose clamps and turn the screws until the clamps are snug around the MAPP gas cylinder. Using two clamps will prevent the

Observing a Kiln During Firing: What's Normal?

Observing a Kiln During Firing: What's Normal? Why does my kiln make a buzzing sound? Here are some of the sounds that a kiln makes The heating elements hum when they turn on.That is because they vibrate in the brick grooves due to magnetism between the coils. This sound is normal. It diminishes as the kiln gets hotter, because the elements soften. The clicking noise of a switch-operated kiln is also normal.It is the sound of an infinite control switch cycling on and off. When the clicking turns into a popping noise, the switch is probably about to fail. You should keep a spare on hand. Relays are another source of clicking.To turn on the elements, a digital controller sends twelve volts to the relays. The relays, in turn, act as switches and send full voltage to the elements. The relays click every time they turn on. A chattering noise, however, indicates that a relay is about

Mosaics: Piecing It All Together

Mosaics: Piecing It All Together Mosaics add charm and whimsy to any room in your home or corner of your garden. Mosaics are not only beautiful to display, but they are truly a lot of fun to make. Traditional mosaics are made by cutting tiny pieces of glass and fitting them together with just enough space between each piece for grout. Traditions change, however, and todays contemporary mosaics are not only made from glass but broken china pieces, buttons, shells and even Grandmas rhinestone jewelry. To begin, choose an item on which to mosaic- fountains, small bistro tables and stepping stones are good starting places, but generally mosaics can be applied to any and all surfaces. If youve chosen a smooth surface, rough it up first using fine grit sandpaper or score it using a craft knife. A rough surface will allow the adhesive to form a better grip. Next, decide on a pattern for

Spotlighting Your Artwork

Spotlighting Your Artwork Spotlighting can add a touch of drama to your images, but it doesnt work with all types of crafts. This lighting technique can easily be used with matte and flat- surfaced work, while shiny surfaces can be a nightmare to get just right. Lets start by looking at how to create a circle of light in the darkness; the simplest way is to use a snoot over the lights reflector housing. A snoot is simply a tapered metal cone that fits over the light and creates a small circle of light instead of a large area of diffused light. With your object on a black background, the circle of light will appear as a light gray area without well-defined edges. For a tighter circle with a better definededge, you need to use a spotlight (a light source with some sort of lens in front that focuses the light into a

Combining Fabric or Paper with Your Glass

Combining Fabric or Paper with Your Glass Did you know that you can sandwich fabric (or paper) between glass just like you do with pressed flowers? It sure opens up a lot of possibilities for creating one-of-a-kind projects. Heres how 1 Cut two pieces of thin clear glass (ideally, single strength or thinner) to match your pattern piece. Dull the edges of each piece, if necessary, with a fine grinder bit or scythe stone. 2 Carefully clean the surfaces of these pieces that will be on the inside of the sandwich. Once you have sandwiched the fabric inside the glass, you wont be able to clean the glass again. 3 Cut a piece of fabric to match the glass pieces you cut. 4 To create your sandwich, place the fabric on the bottom piece of glass (clean side up). Add the top piece of glass (clean side down). Now hold your sandwich together with a couple of

Avoid Getting Stiff and Sore

Avoid Getting Stiff and Sore I really enjoy stained glass, but after I work on a project for a while, I get stiff and sore. What am I doing wrong? We all enjoy stained glass and most of us find it to be a relaxing hobby. But did you ever finish a project, step back to look at it and realize that your back hurt, or your hands feel tight, or you have a splitting headache? Did you know that many of these symptoms can be avoided by applying a few simple rules of ergonomics. You most likely have heard the word, but did you know that it’s just a fancy way of saying, “fit the task to the person?” There are many ways to accomplish just that, and you’d be surprised how simple it really is. Most people are so intent on what they are doing (enjoying our favorite hobby. ) that they don’t

Bedazzled Earrings: A Microwave Fusing Project

Bedazzled Earrings: A Microwave Fusing Project By Rita Levine Skill Level 2 (Adult 1-5 1 being the easiest, 5 being most difficult) Time to Complete 45 Minutes Materials Fuseworks Kiln Fuseworks Kiln Paper Fuseworks Glass Cutter Wheeled Glass Nippers Ruler Westrim pearl assortment Sterling Silver Plated Square Cabochon Mini Links - Delphi 85435 2 hat pins Earring wires Scrap fusing glass 90 COE Chain-nose pliers Round-nose pliers Instructions 1. Place white glass on a clean flat cutting surface with the smooth side of the glass facing towards you. 2. Start on an edge of the glass holding the cutter firmly in one hand. Keep the cutter perpendicular to the glass. Push the cutter gently and evenly across the glass. Decrease pressure slightly as you reach the opposite edge of the glass; lift the cutter off the glass at the end. 3. Breaking the score line can be done with breaking pliers. Hold the glass in

Beautiful Mosaic Wall Hanging-Step by Step

Beautiful Mosaic Wall Hanging-Step by Step For all of you glass hobbyists who would love to work with mosaics but havent gotten up enough courage, this article is for you. This project will give you the chance to create three tiles that are meant to be used as a wall hanging. We used the same process as the one for making stepping-stones. But the main difference in making a wall hanging is the thicknesswe will use only half of the recommended amount of DiamondCrete for the 12 square mold. Our design is an elegant Victorian motif that can be built as shown in three 12 square tiles and hung about 1 apart, or the project can be simplified by using just the center design. Leave out the two pieces to the far right and left of the center design and this would look fine by itself as a wall hanging or a stepping-stone. Just remember

Dragonfly Garden Stake

Dragonfly Garden Stake Lately, Ive been spending a lot of time in my backyard. My father (a retired horticulture professor and perpetual gardener) has been preparing my quarter-acre lot for a vegetable garden. As soon as I saw this project guide, I could envision stained glass dragonflies peeking out amidst my beans and greens. They are perfect for adding a little sparkle to your summer landscape. DOWNLOAD THE PATTERN HERE Materials Wissmach Sky Blue and Crystal Stream X for Wings, 1/2 Sq. Ft. (or other glass color of choice) Wissmach Dark Blue/Medium Green Opal for Body, 1/3 Sq. Ft. (or other glass color of choice) Flux Solder 7/32 Copper Foil 20-, 22-, and 16-Gauge Copper Wire 2 Small Green Nuggets 1/8 Copper or Brass Rod Black Patina Directions This is one of many of the garden stake designs in Leslie Gibbs book, Garden Art in Glass. There is a lot more information

Bullseye Thinfire Shelf Paper to the Skin's Rescue

Bullseye Thinfire Shelf Paper to the Skin's Rescue As a fused glass jewelry artisan I have probably spent as much time on the look and feel of the backs of my pieces as the fronts. I have found that the feel of the glass on the skin is as much a selling point as the colors or design. Its the same conundrum fiber artists have been dealing with for ages wool is an amazing fiber - easy to knit with and warm - but the majority of folks just cant stand that itchy feeling on bare skin. The same principle applies to glass. What you use on your kiln shelf can determine exactly how your pieces will feel on the skin - and in turn, can make for a happier customer. After experimenting with various methods including kiln wash (produces a very rough feel) and thicker fiber papers/boards (again, too rough) I have settled down into a

Learn from the Best- Spring 2015 Delphi Guest Instructors

Learn from the Best- Spring 2015 Delphi Guest Instructors The Spring 2015 session of art glass classes at Delphis Creativity Center in Lansing, MI is all set to start. This season renowned glass artists Cathy Claycomb and Margaret Zinser join Tim Drier and Carol Shelkin to help expand the scope of your glassworking skills. Get to know each artist and their work, then see which class is right for you. Class sizes are limited so register now to ensure your opportunity to work with these amazing artists. Tim Drier Tim Drier has been a glassblower for 25 years, and applies his scientific glassblowing expertise to artistic flameworking. He concentrates on creating decanters, goblets, vases, and human sculptural forms. Drier has taught flameworking courses at The Studio and the Pittsburgh Glass Center, and has demonstrated at the International Flameworkers Conference at Salem Community College. Check out Tims work on his Corning Museum of Glass page or