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Grinding Glass with the Glastar Super II Grinder

Grinding Glass with the Glastar Super II Grinder The Glastar Super II Grinder is a glass grinder that artist, hobbyists, schools, and studios will enjoy. Save time by grinding down uneven glass to make your glass fit your design. The Glastar Super II Grinder features a 1/2 hp motor and comes with a 3/4 and a 1/4 grinder bits, and a 5 year manufacturer warranty.

Removing a Frozen Grinder Head

Removing a Frozen Grinder Head The grinding head on my grinder is frozen on the motor shaft. How do I remove it? You may find that you can move the grinder head down, but not up and off, the shaft. This is due to the shaft becoming larger for one of two reasons. First, glass, dust and debris accumulate on the shaft. This coating builds up and makes the shaft larger. The second possibility is a nick or scar on the shaft, causing the same thing. In either case, push the bit down to get it out of the way. Then, using a fine steel wool, gently polish the motor shaft (with the motor running) for about a minute. The bit will usually then just lift right off. If this attempt does not work, you can apply an anti-seize liquid or spray (such as WD-40) onto the grinding head and motor shaft. Wait 10 or

Grind Glass Without a Glass Grinder

Grind Glass Without a Glass Grinder I love my glass grinder. In fact, I have a couple of them. But I dont grind every piece of glass that I cut. For me, its not necessary. If you can cut accurately, and by accurately I mean no bigger or smaller than your pattern, you may be able to cut down on your projects time by trying out a tool that Ive come to love and rely upon, my grinding stone. A grinding stone, or abrasive stone harks to an earlier day in the history of glass cutting, but still has its value when used in conjunction with good solid, glass scoring and breaking technique. In the pre-grinder days, these stones were de rigueur for the well equipped glazier and to put it simply, they got the job done. Learning to use the stone will take about thirty seconds of training; implementing it can save you hours.

Simple Solutions to Glass Art Pet Peeves

Simple Solutions to Glass Art Pet Peeves Here at Delphi, we love a good reason to celebrate. With the Holiday Season still looming weeks away, we were feeling anxious for a bit of excitement now. The good news? There are lots of lesser known holidays scattered throughout the year if you only look for them. (September includes a favorite of ours; National Talk Like a Pirate Day.) We needed another zany mood boost to get us through Thats how we found this gem Its National Pet Peeve Week. In honor of this holiday we thought long and hard about what really gets under our skin and pushes our buttons while working on projects. Check out our top glass art pet peeves, and the simple solutions sure to put a smile back on your face. Pet Peeve Disappearing Marker Lines Solution Mark Stay II saves the day. Just wipe

Combining Fabric or Paper with Your Glass

Combining Fabric or Paper with Your Glass Did you know that you can sandwich fabric (or paper) between glass just like you do with pressed flowers? It sure opens up a lot of possibilities for creating one-of-a-kind projects. Heres how 1 Cut two pieces of thin clear glass (ideally, single strength or thinner) to match your pattern piece. Dull the edges of each piece, if necessary, with a fine grinder bit or scythe stone. 2 Carefully clean the surfaces of these pieces that will be on the inside of the sandwich. Once you have sandwiched the fabric inside the glass, you wont be able to clean the glass again. 3 Cut a piece of fabric to match the glass pieces you cut. 4 To create your sandwich, place the fabric on the bottom piece of glass (clean side up). Add the top piece of glass (clean side down). Now hold your sandwich together with a couple of

What Are Your Favorite Tools?

What Are Your Favorite Tools? No matter what you’re into – mosaics, stained glass, glass fusing, or glass jewelry – Delphi always has the tools you need to be creative. Without your tools, it would be impossible to bring to life all the incredible ideas that you dream up. As our 26th Annual Art Glass Festival quickly approaches, we know our glass artists are busy fusing, firing, and cutting to create their best pieces ever by using their favorite tools. So what are your favorite tools? Let’s explore some of our most popular tools. Toyo Dry Wheel Supercutter Everyone loves this oil-free cutter because it’s easy to use and makes great cuts without all the clean-up. Plus, it’s very durable and the cutter head is replaceable, making this tool a prime choice for glass artists. Creators Premium Bottle Cutter Glass artists that love to upcycle love this tool that makes cutting bottles

Making Thanksgiving Memories

Making Thanksgiving Memories One of my favorite memories growing up in Northern Wisconsin was our annual family Thanksgiving Day dinner. With lingering aromas from the kitchen, waiting to see cousins that I hadnt seen for several months, and the anticipation of who breaks the wishbone, the day seemed magical. Each year it seemed we created new family traditions, and our Delphi Family would like to suggest some traditions your family can start 1. For a fun accent piece for the holiday table, try slumping brown or green bottles as a side dish. The size is perfect to serve Aunt Mildreds sweet potato hash or your family favorite. The color will add punch to the table as well. 2. Make it easy to identify whos drink is whos. We like the idea of creating glass beads strung with silver wire and attached to the goblet stem to claim your stake. As a take