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Janet Schrader

Janet Schrader In 1979, a journey began. Thats the year Janet Schrader began working with glass, and she was immediately hooked. Color is a very important part of who I am, so finding all the properties of changing color in glass has held my interest for many years. I love how glass changes color depending not only on the light source but also that it changes from morning to night as the light quality changes. Around 1988, Janet encountered dichroic glass for the first time, and fusing became the new focus of her glass art launching her successful line of handmade jewelry which she sold nation-wide. Janets one-of-a-kind stained glass, jewelry and fused art have been met with enthusiasm, and winning awards including 1st and 2nd prize in the professional artist category for Fusion/Cast/Kiln work at the 2012 Glass Craft and Bead Expo in Las Vegas.

What Are Your Favorite Tools?

What Are Your Favorite Tools? No matter what you’re into – mosaics, stained glass, glass fusing, or glass jewelry – Delphi always has the tools you need to be creative. Without your tools, it would be impossible to bring to life all the incredible ideas that you dream up. As our 26th Annual Art Glass Festival quickly approaches, we know our glass artists are busy fusing, firing, and cutting to create their best pieces ever by using their favorite tools. So what are your favorite tools? Let’s explore some of our most popular tools. Toyo Dry Wheel Supercutter Everyone loves this oil-free cutter because it’s easy to use and makes great cuts without all the clean-up. Plus, it’s very durable and the cutter head is replaceable, making this tool a prime choice for glass artists. Creators Premium Bottle Cutter Glass artists that love to upcycle love this tool that makes cutting bottles

Medium Mashup: Working with Fused Glass and Silver

Medium Mashup: Working with Fused Glass and Silver It is true. Even the best of us get bored. We work and learn and experiment with one medium or one itty piece of said medium (which, like a new love, we are infatuated with - can think of nothing else)but, after a while -things can get stale. Its normal. The beauty is to realize that all these lovely and wonderful and awe inspiring mediums do not have to live in a vacuum. When you get bored with onedo a little of what I like to call Medium Mash-Up. My latest mashups have been with my own fused glass and silver. You can only fuse so many pendants and plates before youve had enough. For me, that means its time to move on to another process for a while. After working in silver (mostly rings) and loving itone day I found myself staring longingly at my lonely and unused kiln

Stained Glass News March 2013 Edition - 5 Hot Products for Spring

Stained Glass News March 2013 Edition - 5 Hot Products for Spring Heres our list of the 5 hottest new and featured items from the March 2013 of Stained Glass News 1. Creators Premium Bottle Cutter What can the makers of the popular Cutters Mate and Beetle Bits Cutting Systems do with a bottle cutter? It turns out - A LOT. They have designed a premium, top-of-the-line bottle cutter that is sturdy, easy to use and gives superior results. We love the special features on the Creators Bottle Cutter, especially the aluminum slide bar ruler which makes cutting precise sizes a cinch, and the adjustable carbide cutting wheel so getting perfect pressure for an even score is a breeze. Want to learn more? See how it works with step-by-step photos and instruction. 2. Once You Try an Electric Mandrel Spinner, You Will Wonder How You Ever Created Beads Without One. With the Electric Mandrel Spinner, you will free yourself from arm

Spotlighting Your Artwork

Spotlighting Your Artwork Spotlighting can add a touch of drama to your images, but it doesnt work with all types of crafts. This lighting technique can easily be used with matte and flat- surfaced work, while shiny surfaces can be a nightmare to get just right. Lets start by looking at how to create a circle of light in the darkness; the simplest way is to use a snoot over the lights reflector housing. A snoot is simply a tapered metal cone that fits over the light and creates a small circle of light instead of a large area of diffused light. With your object on a black background, the circle of light will appear as a light gray area without well-defined edges. For a tighter circle with a better definededge, you need to use a spotlight (a light source with some sort of lens in front that focuses the light into a

Fused Stained Glass Pendant

Fused Stained Glass Pendant Sometimes necessity is the mother of invention, and sometimes invention comes when you have nothing to lose. Early in my career, I had three metal-clay-and-fused-glass pendants fail in a single day. The glass cabochons simply shattered and fell away from the silver after the pieces were fired because I had neglected to cut an expansion hole underneath the cabochons. Augghh. Lesson learned. But now I was left with three ugly pieces of silver, each with small pieces of glass permanently fused into bizarre locations on the surfacea loss I could not afford. Weeks later, after tryingunsuccessfully to remove the glass, I decided to try fusing glass in patterns onto the surface of the pendants. The results were surprising, and the Stained Glass process was born This technique begins with any fired metal clay with a flat surface. Small shards of fusible glass are then attached to the silver. After

Explosions of Colour by Mollie Barrow

Explosions of Colour by Mollie Barrow We found Mollie Barrow on Facebook in the midst of a discussion on Pot Melts. Mollie cooks up her incredible glass creations in a quiet eco-village in rural Ireland with her 10-year old son Elliot and cats Bonnie and Oscar. She is continually inspired by the Northern Lights, and the rich swirls of color in her pieces prove it. We were blown away by her magical melts, and we know you will be too. How did you get started in glass? Ive been in love with glass art since I visited the Murano Glass Factory in Venice when I was 16. I was hypnotised by the skill and speed those guys had working with molten glass, and I would have loved to pursue glass seriously from then. As is often the case, however, life had other plans and it wasnt until I was in my late 20s that I