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Regular Solder vs. Lead-Free Solder

Regular Solder vs. Lead-Free Solder I have some questions about Lead-Free Solder. Does it tarnish over time? Can you use patina on it? Does it flow like regular solder? Is it better than regular solder? We are sure that you arent the only one with these questions. Lets start with the question of whether or not its better than regular solder. Since the harm from lead is caused by ingestion, any project that will come in contact with food or food containers should be made with lead-free solder. In addition, anything that is handled, like jewelry or kaleidoscopes, should be made with lead-free solder. Hands have a terrible habit of making it into the mouth before they get washed. So, yes it is better than regular solder in these situations. As far as working with solder, you should be diligent about cleaning your hands after touching any solder. Dont eat, drink, smoke, or do anything

The Correct Way to Mitre Lead for Diamonds

The Correct Way to Mitre Lead for Diamonds Can you please tell me the correct way to mitre the lead for diamonds? Diamonds can be tricky. This diagram shows the way we would go about cutting the lead for a diamond. We find the easiest way to decide where to mitre the lead is by drawing lines on the diamond connecting the opposite points. Then, put a piece of lead on the glass and extend that line onto the lead. Now remove the lead and cut it where you marked. Replace it on the glass, lining it up where it belongs and mark the other end of that piece of lead. Cut it, replace it, and continue until all of the pieces of lead are cut. Reprinted with permission from Stained Glass News. All rights reserved.

How to Handle Your Old Lead Came

How to Handle Your Old Lead Came Even the savviest glass artist will often find random bits of lead came around their studio. Some can be used in new glass art pieces but others are simply unusable. When you have unwanted scrap came, there comes a time when you’ve got to dispose of it. But lead is a heavy metal. Throwing it into your garbage can create a dangerous situation. In certain exposure levels, lead can be poisonous to people and animals too. Lead poisoning can lead to severe symptoms that damage the nervous system and even cause blood or brain disorders. If this sounds scary, that’s because it is. So many people throw old batteries and other items into their trash without a second thought. At Delphi Glass, we urge you to do the responsible thing for lead came scraps and dispose of them properly, not just for your health but also for the

Protecting Stained Glass from the Elements

Protecting Stained Glass from the Elements I want to make some copper foil and lead projects for use outside. How do I protect them from the elements? If you construct your project using the lead technique, there isnt anything else you need to do. The cementing process weatherproofs the project. If you use the copper foil technique, you will want to make sure that there is something to prevent the copper foil from pulling away from the outer edges of the project when it gets wet. This can be accomplished by using a rigid metal channel (zinc, copper or brass) or by soldering a reinforcing wire around the perimeter of the piece. Another thing you should consider is using mosaic techniques. Either the direct or indirect methods are great for outdoor projects. Your supplier will have information on these techniques if you are unfamiliar with them. Whatever technique you choose to employ, it is best to

Cutting a Pattern Properly

Cutting a Pattern Properly When cutting out a pattern, where do you cut? With the proper scissors, is it on the line or left or right of the line? If, by proper scissors, you mean the three-bladed pattern shears, you want to cut by placing the center blade of the shears right on pattern line. The two outside blades will then cut the pattern on either side of the center blade. This removes a small strip of paper between each of the pattern pieces. You need to make sure youre using the right shears for the method of construction youve decided to use. Foil shears allow for two thicknesses of copper foil. Lead shears have a thicker center blade which allows for the heart of lead came. If you are using regular scissors (that dont have the extra blade) you will need to cut twice, once on each side of the line, for your

Help! My Patterns Are Growing...

Help! My Patterns Are Growing... My panels always grow, even though I use pattern shears. Should the pieces, once cut and ground, fit in the white part of the pattern leaving the black lines to represent lead or foil? That is exactly where the pieces should fit. But as you have found out, sometimes thats easier said than done. Lets take a look at all the places your pieces can grow 1) Making a copy of your pattern for cutting out pattern pieces. First, determine if the line width on your pattern is appropriate for copper foil or lead. When tracing the pattern, try a few different felt pens until you find one that is the appropriate width for the technique you are using. The wrong width pen may cause the pattern pieces to be either too big, or too small. A good way to determine the appropriate width is to make some test cuts

Glass Works Stained Glass Studio, NC

Glass Works Stained Glass Studio, NC When Mike Hartwig and Kevin McDaniel opened Glass Works Stained Glass Studio in 1997, they made it their goal to create a place where do-it-yourselfers could feel comfortable. Whether artists came there to buy supplies, ask questions or learn something new, Mike and Kevin wanted to offer it all.Both men had more than 25 years of experience in stained glass work including design, construction, repairs as well as teaching classes and operating a stained glass retail business. They knew what artists needed to be successful. In that same vein, they constantly sought to offer their customers new and exciting products and services to keep them interested. What inspires me most is being of help to our customers, Mike said.Whether it is someone looking for a piece of leaded glass for their home or church or just looking for that certain item to complete their own project. The products we

Dealer Spotlight: Avalon Stained Glass

Dealer Spotlight: Avalon Stained Glass Twelve years ago Arlene saw an ad for a two-week workshop on stained glass. Arlene Wright-Correll and her husband Carl Correll had just retired from 43 successful years in business, the last 7 spent building and then running their own B&B and campgrounds on the Appalachian Trail. When Arlene approached her husband about taking the class together, Carl thought she was crazy -- he couldnt even cut glass. But being the good husband he was, he went along with her idea and became what Arlene affectionately calls, the Stained Glass Frankenstein Monster. For 12 years now, Carl has created and taught the art of stained glass. The couple began Avalon Stained Glass School & Creativity Center in December 1998. Between the two of them (currently ages 75 and 77), Arlene and Carl teach approximately 22 workshops in stained glass, leaded glass, etched glass, fused glass and all kinds of

Fused Stained Glass Pendant

Fused Stained Glass Pendant Sometimes necessity is the mother of invention, and sometimes invention comes when you have nothing to lose. Early in my career, I had three metal-clay-and-fused-glass pendants fail in a single day. The glass cabochons simply shattered and fell away from the silver after the pieces were fired because I had neglected to cut an expansion hole underneath the cabochons. Augghh. Lesson learned. But now I was left with three ugly pieces of silver, each with small pieces of glass permanently fused into bizarre locations on the surfacea loss I could not afford. Weeks later, after tryingunsuccessfully to remove the glass, I decided to try fusing glass in patterns onto the surface of the pendants. The results were surprising, and the Stained Glass process was born This technique begins with any fired metal clay with a flat surface. Small shards of fusible glass are then attached to the silver. After

ZN Stained Glass: Capturing Creativity

ZN Stained Glass: Capturing Creativity Think of it this way youre attempting to capture something that doesnt actually exist. A mythical creature that can change shape, even meaning at any given time; and youre expected to do it, again and again, over and over, til the end of time. Sounds all kinds of easy, right? Its actually about as easy as it sounds. Creativity is the mythical creature, Im the person thats supposed to capture it. Thats my life as an artist. More specifically, a stained glass artist. My love of glass started at a very young age--the exact age doesnt matter--but I know I was short enough to be patted on the top of my curly head by hundreds of people while they called me small boy since I was too painfully shy to introduce myself. I was dragged through hundreds of cathedrals and museums here and abroad. I saw the works of

Simple Solutions to Glass Art Pet Peeves

Simple Solutions to Glass Art Pet Peeves Here at Delphi, we love a good reason to celebrate. With the Holiday Season still looming weeks away, we were feeling anxious for a bit of excitement now. The good news? There are lots of lesser known holidays scattered throughout the year if you only look for them. (September includes a favorite of ours; National Talk Like a Pirate Day.) We needed another zany mood boost to get us through Thats how we found this gem Its National Pet Peeve Week. In honor of this holiday we thought long and hard about what really gets under our skin and pushes our buttons while working on projects. Check out our top glass art pet peeves, and the simple solutions sure to put a smile back on your face. Pet Peeve Disappearing Marker Lines Solution Mark Stay II saves the day. Just wipe

MSU Pre-cut Art Glass Lets Fans be Crafty

MSU Pre-cut Art Glass Lets Fans be Crafty At the height of an undefeated season for MSU (and a big win over University of Michigan) Delphi’s new Licensed Pre-cut Glass Emblems couldn’t come at a better time. For the past 38 years, the Lansing-based company has supplied glass artists with high quality art glass supplies and education. But they haven’t been able to offer pre-cut glass mascots and logos until now. These exclusive pre-cuts are designed to make it easy for people, even those with no previous art glass experience, to create MSU-themed projects like garden stepping stones, serving platters, wall art and fashion accessories. Delphi currently carries two designs, the MSU Spartan “S” logo and Spartan Helmet mascot emblem. Sizes range from 1/2 inch to 6 inches. Pre-cuts are available in either aventurine green, a dark green with metallic sparkle, or solid white. Both colors are lead-free and food safe. All glass is tested 96 COE compatible

5 New Items Just Announced in Stained Glass News

5 New Items Just Announced in Stained Glass News Heres our list of 5 Favorite New Items from the May 2012 edition of Stained Glass News. 1. Hot, Hot, Hot by Christine Stewart Celebrated glass artist Christine Stewart brings us a long-anticipated new title. In her signature mosaic style she serves up 18 projects ranging from fused glass dinnerware to stunning mosaic wall art created with fused inclusions. 2. Inspired by Frankye Cartner and Suzy Huber This stained glass pattern portfolio contains 16 designs for panels in a variety of themes. Each project includes recommendations for using wire, bevels or other accents, and a suggested enlargement size. Projects are certain to provide a fun challenge for beginners and intermediate artists alike. 3. Assembling 3D art just got easier with Handy Wedges These simple non-slip foam rubber blocks offer the perfect solution when you find yourself in need of another set of hands. The triangular shape lends itself to

Stained Glass News Feb. 2013 Edition- See What's New

Stained Glass News Feb. 2013 Edition- See What's New Heres our list of 5 Favorite New Items from the February 2013 edition of Stained Glass News. 1. Snowflake Casting Molds from Colour de Verre With the new premium mold from Colour de Verre you can make incredibly detailed, beautiful snowflakes. There are so many ways you can use these snowflakes. Hang them on their own (they are light) or incorporate them into projects. Were excited about how creative you can get making the snowflakes depending on the size of frit and firing temperature. LOVE them with dichroic. Check out the mold and free project sheets posted on our website. You wont believe the gallery quality of the pieces you can create. 2. Barefoot Tools are Back and Better Than Ever. Powder Vibe Electric Mandrel Spinner The Bearfoot Tools line has some of our customers favorite tool; and

Art Glass Fairytale Winner Receives Fusing Grab Bag!

Art Glass Fairytale Winner Receives Fusing Grab Bag! Thank you to everyone who entered our Art Glass Fairytale contest. Im continually amazed at the creativity of our customers - I had no idea our artists were writers too. It was very difficult choosing a winner for the Fused Glass grab bag. Many of you shared personal stories of hardship or tragedy and how you overcame them through glass. Thank you for inspring us. Congratulations go to Jude Wilder-Roberts for her tale of Uroboros and the Very First Rainbow. You can read her story below. We may also be featuring other entries in future blog posts or catalogs - so stay tuned. Once upon a time in a dreary, colorless land lived a girl named Uroboros. Since there were no colors in the town of Youghiogheny, where she lived, everyone was sad. One day while collecting drift wood on Kokomo beach, Uro found a piece of beach glass. The

Mark Hall: Leaving His Mark on the Glass World

Mark Hall: Leaving His Mark on the Glass World We recently asked our Facebook fans to send us photos of glass art from their gardens. We received some especially interesting photos from glass artist Mark Hall. Impressed as we were, we realized that Marks talent goes far beyond the confines of his garden. He is self-taught and has mastered German leading techniques, hand beveling, mirroring and sandblasting among other techniques. He fine-tuned hisskills while studying abroad in Germany at Derix Glass Studio,at Pilchuck School of Glass in Washington, andwith The Studio at the Corning Museum of Glass in New York. He and his wife, Leslie, now work together at Hallmark Glass. How did you get started in glass? In 1976 my brother informed me hed started a business, and I was his partner. Surprised, I asked, Whats our business? He responded, Stained glass. I knew nothing about it, so I learned how to make a window on our first

Emily J Cole: A New Town, A New Passion

Emily J Cole: A New Town, A New Passion How did you get started in glass? I was lonely. I moved to Richmond, VA from Minneapolis, MN about six years ago, and didnt know a soul. I had a friend back in MN who worked with stained glass and it sounded fun and challenging. When I saw that Richmonds local Visual Arts Center offered evening stained glass classes, I decided to try it. Turns out, I love working with glass. (And I met some other great creative people too. ) Why glass? Prior to working with glass, I was (and still am) an admirer of all types of glass creations leaded, fused, blown, mosaics, etc. I never considered trying leaded glass myself until my friend told me about the process, and totally demystified it. And then I thought, I think I need to do this. I really enjoy the puzzle fitting the pieces together to create something beautiful is

Tulips for Every Occasion

Tulips for Every Occasion Tulips are my favorite flower. They symbolize the coming of spring, new beginnings and the end of winters cold, dark days. Tulips are not too showy or too dramatic. They are subtle but striking. I think they are perfect. Like most flowers, different colors of tulips represent different feelings and emotions. According to ProFlowers.com, red represents true love, purple represents royalty, white stands for forgiveness and yellow conveys cheerfulness. If youre a beginning stained glass artist and youre looking for a simple lead project that will be treasured for years to come, try this Free Tulip Pattern from Glass Patterns Quarterly. You could make a tulip of every color.

Don't Miss Delphi's Winter Open House

Don't Miss Delphi's Winter Open House Delphis Winter Open House is one of our most popular events of the year. Free to the public, visitors can attend previews of many of our most popular classes - even new classes. Dont miss this exciting chance to meet our fabulous instructors and network with other artists. When Saturday, January 14th 2012, 10am to 4pm 10 00 am - 11 15 am Free Flameworking Previews Glass Bead Making / Beads on Minor / Intensive Bead Workshop / Intro to Boro/Boro Jewelry / Decorative Blown Glass Spheres / Marble Making 11 30 am - 12 30 pm Free Stained Glass Previews Beginning Lead Came / Lead Came Construction / Cutting Art Glass / Soldering Made Easy Bandsaw Magic / Designing & Installing Kitchen Cabinets Beginning Stained Glass / Copper Foil Studio / Tiffany Lamps / Panel Lamps 12 45 pm - 1 15 pm Free Jewelry Previews Beginning Metal Clay

Guest Instructor Jan Schrader Demystifies Mica Powder

Guest Instructor Jan Schrader Demystifies Mica Powder Imagine creating waterfalls that actually shimmer or night stars that really twinkle. Delphi is bringing in guest instructor Janet Schrader to show students at the Lansing Creativity Center how to do just that. Janet will show students how to achieve different textures, colors and effects with mica powder. Mica can be used to liven up Christmas ornaments, jewelry, mixed media projects and more. Each student will make a pendant and several samples to take home. Class will be held Thursday, Jun 24th from 6 00 pm - 9 00 pm. Glass Artist Janet Schrader lives outside Olympia WA where she has been doing glass since 1979. She has won both local and national competitions for her stained glass and jewelry designs. Always wanting to find something exciting and different to do with glass kept Janet creating and developing new designs and one-of-a-kind works of art. The same desire for something

Star-Spangled Ways to Be Creative for July 4th

Star-Spangled Ways to Be Creative for July 4th Summer is officially here and with the longest day of the year already in the books, now we can look forward to celebrating America’s birthday on July 4th. No doubt you’ve got big plans to have everyone over to celebrate with a big backyard barbecue or pool party. As you’re busily buying up hotdogs, buns, condiments, chips, burgers and other tasty July 4th food staples, don’t forget about using your creativity to make some spectacular star-spangled 4th of July glass art to show off to family and friends when they come over. Delphi Glass has 2 fantastic free guides to help you bring out the freedom in your creativity for 4th of July. One of them is the Free Eagle Stepping Stone Project Guide. Ideal for those with intermediate stained glass skills, the hexagonal shape of the stone will be a welcome addition to any backyard, or can

Janet Schrader

Janet Schrader In 1979, a journey began. Thats the year Janet Schrader began working with glass, and she was immediately hooked. Color is a very important part of who I am, so finding all the properties of changing color in glass has held my interest for many years. I love how glass changes color depending not only on the light source but also that it changes from morning to night as the light quality changes. Around 1988, Janet encountered dichroic glass for the first time, and fusing became the new focus of her glass art launching her successful line of handmade jewelry which she sold nation-wide. Janets one-of-a-kind stained glass, jewelry and fused art have been met with enthusiasm, and winning awards including 1st and 2nd prize in the professional artist category for Fusion/Cast/Kiln work at the 2012 Glass Craft and Bead Expo in Las Vegas.

How to Use Two Pieces of Mirror Back-To-Back

How to Use Two Pieces of Mirror Back-To-Back Can I use two pieces of mirror back to back in a window so it will look nice from both sides? Yes, you can. Like any pieces of mirror you use in a panel, youll want to use a sealant of some kind (ask your supplier for a recommendation) on the edges and back side of each piece before placing them back to back. The sealant is used to help prevent black rot a discoloring of the mirror caused when something nasty, most likely the flux, gets between the mirrored surface and the glass itself. The sealant is applied after youve cut and ground each piece of mirror to its final shape. Once the mirrors are cut and sealed, hold them back to back and wrap a wide foil (probably 3/8 if youre using 1/8 thick mirror) around the edge of both pieces together. You now have a piece thats

From Rural Workshop to World-Renowned Studio

From Rural Workshop to World-Renowned Studio Bayou Sal Glassworks began in early 2005, as a backyard studio in an unused workshop 17 miles outside of Franklin LA. Owners Paul Weiss Jr. and Russ Peltier had hopes that their glass working skills could occasionally supplement their household income, but didnt have grand expectations since they lived in such a remote rural area. They first made a few windows for friends and family members, and soon people were requesting that they teach classes. They held their first class in the spring of 2006 with three students. As word got around, more students enrolled, and as more custom orders came in, the part-time hobby became their main source of income. In 2008, the studio had to be enlarged to meet their growing needs. As 2010 draws to a close, their work beautifies homes from New York to California, and from Oregon to Florida. They are currently commissioned by

13 Ways to Overcome Artist's Block

13 Ways to Overcome Artist's Block Its not just writers that suffer from writers block. Artists fall victim to a similar condition. Youre sitting alone in your workspace looking around and...nothing. Youve lost the ability to produce a new idea, much less a new work of art. Sometimes the absence is temporary - just a moment or two. Other times you mull around for weeks feeling lost. What do you do to get your creative juices flowing again? We asked our Facebook fans to share their ideas. Here are a few of our favorites Play loud music. Cut and break glass. - Amy M. Step away. Look for inspiration elsewhere. Go to a museum, watch a program about something unusual. Just do something new. - Jacque D. Pinterest. - Dawn M. Go for a walk. Look for nature to inspire you. -Shirley J. Clean your workspace. Then get out and explore somwhere - even if