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How to: Fake a Kiln Rake

How to: Fake a Kiln Rake I know Ill never get up the nerve to open my kiln to rake. Instead, I was wondering, can I fake...I mean, rake it? I was recently in Monterey, CA visiting a shop on Cannery Row, where glass artist David Alcala is usually busy at work. The day I visited, he was out (at the Glass Art Bead Expo) promoting his new book and Flexi-Glass. His lovely wife was holding down the fort and I marveled at his landscapes made with fine glass frit. I knew I had a lot of Uroboros frit and powder at home, and it inspired me to try and fake a kiln rake with frit. I laid out a sheet of newspaper, and donned my goggles and face mask. I cut out a 10-inch transparent glass circle, so I would have a double-sided plate. Next, I sprinkled a bunch of purple powder, then white, and

Getting a Good Black Patina on Zinc

Getting a Good Black Patina on Zinc No two ways about it, getting a good black patina on zinc came can be a problem. But it is not impossible. I sometimes tell my students that the best thing about using zinc on their project, is that it will probably disappear inside their projects wood frame, but that doesnt have to be the case. Follow these few simple steps and youll find that, with a few modifications to standard patina finishing procedure, getting a nice dark finish on zinc isnt such a mystery after all. You wont be able to get a copper sulfate finish on zinc; the chemicals just wont work, but you can get a number of shades from light charcoal to black Step One Metal Prep Zinc fresh out of the case, like any other metal, will immediately begin to oxidize. You may not be able to see any visible signs of oxidation, but believe

6 Tips for Decorating Your Thanksgiving Table with Glass

6 Tips for Decorating Your Thanksgiving Table with Glass Show off your art glass creations. Here are 6 easy and inexpensive ways to incorporate art glass into your Thanksgiving dinner table dcor. 1. Glass bottles are easy and inexpensive to use. Cut the bottoms of glass bottles of varying heights. Place over votive candles, and decorate with etching, twine, ribbon and other found objects. Download instructions on how to make the centerpiece pictured top right. I also love these amber-colored bottle hurricanes I found onEtsy (at right). They provide just the right amount of romantic ambiance for the dinner table. 2. Decorate pillar candles with glass frit for extra sparkle. In browing for Thanksgiving inspiration online, I ran across this great idea by HGTV to roll pillar candles in lentils for a unique table decoration. Then I thought, why not roll them in glass frit. The frit

Tiffany Art Exhibition Showcases Objects in New Ways

Tiffany Art Exhibition Showcases Objects in New Ways The Flint Institute of Arts (FIA) is currently hosting Tiffany Lamps Articles of Utility, Objects of Art - a celebration of Louis Comfort Tiffanys artistic contributions. According to the FIA website, the exhibition offers more than 40 stunning objects in an array of colors, sizes and decorative styles featured in five sections exploring themes of fabrication, design inspiration and changing lighting technologies. The show also includes tools, materials and photographs demonstrating how objects were designed and made. Tiffany is known for his stained glass windows and lamps, but he also created glass mosaics, blown glass pieces, ceramics, jewelry and metalwork. The first Tiffany Glass Company was incorporated 1885, which later became known as Tiffany Studios. His company concentrated on stained glass windows and lamps, but designed a myriad of other interior decorations. Tiffany Lamps Articles of Utility, Objects of Art Johnson and Rabiah Galleries 5.23.10 - 8.15.10 www.flintarts.org Community leaders

Craig Mitchell Smith: Developing His Own Style

Craig Mitchell Smith: Developing His Own Style How did you get started in glass? I got started in glass by taking a glass class at Delphi in the winter of 2005. I was hooked. I just couldnt stop, I was making glass with a friend who had a ceramic kiln when HGTV offered to come film my work in glass. I had nine weeks to prepare, and I went to Delphi and bought a coffin kiln and glass and went to work, making pieces that made sense for my garden. Only after the segment aired, and galleries started calling offering representation did I consider glass as a career. Now I have had 26 gallery shows, three museum showings and three large public garden exhibitions. I just opened my own gallery. You mentioned in the biography on your website that you have done painting, interior design, set design and floral design. How have these activities influenced your work

Explosions of Colour by Mollie Barrow

Explosions of Colour by Mollie Barrow We found Mollie Barrow on Facebook in the midst of a discussion on Pot Melts. Mollie cooks up her incredible glass creations in a quiet eco-village in rural Ireland with her 10-year old son Elliot and cats Bonnie and Oscar. She is continually inspired by the Northern Lights, and the rich swirls of color in her pieces prove it. We were blown away by her magical melts, and we know you will be too. How did you get started in glass? Ive been in love with glass art since I visited the Murano Glass Factory in Venice when I was 16. I was hypnotised by the skill and speed those guys had working with molten glass, and I would have loved to pursue glass seriously from then. As is often the case, however, life had other plans and it wasnt until I was in my late 20s that I

Learn from the Best- Spring 2015 Delphi Guest Instructors

Learn from the Best- Spring 2015 Delphi Guest Instructors The Spring 2015 session of art glass classes at Delphis Creativity Center in Lansing, MI is all set to start. This season renowned glass artists Cathy Claycomb and Margaret Zinser join Tim Drier and Carol Shelkin to help expand the scope of your glassworking skills. Get to know each artist and their work, then see which class is right for you. Class sizes are limited so register now to ensure your opportunity to work with these amazing artists. Tim Drier Tim Drier has been a glassblower for 25 years, and applies his scientific glassblowing expertise to artistic flameworking. He concentrates on creating decanters, goblets, vases, and human sculptural forms. Drier has taught flameworking courses at The Studio and the Pittsburgh Glass Center, and has demonstrated at the International Flameworkers Conference at Salem Community College. Check out Tims work on his Corning Museum of Glass page or

Kitengela-Glass Paradise

Kitengela-Glass Paradise I had received an e-mail inviting me to Kenya, and a lifelong dream of mine, going to Africa, was about to be fulfilled. My hosts were sharing their latest adventure Weve been away and something is tearing up the roofs again, probably bush babies (lemurs), certainly baboons, and probably leopards as well. Id heard that Laurel True had just visited Kitengela Glass Research outside Nairobi, and I called on her for advice. You should go. Another friend who had recently visited Kitengela had advised me to get in touch with Nani Croze. I had thoroughly reviewed www.kitengela-glass.com, but there was no way possible- that I could ever have conceived the journey I was about to take. And now, Id like to take you with me. Necessity, the Mother of Invention Thirty years ago on the Maasai Mara in Kenya, Nani Croze, looking for a way to support her three