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Top 10 Most Popular Art Glass Products of 2012...so far

Top 10 Most Popular Art Glass Products of 2012...so far 2012 is looking like a banner year for art glass. To give you an idea of what your fellow artists are creating, weve compiled a list of our top 10 most popular products since January. Among the most notable trends of 2012 are fused jewelry and bottle art. In particular, artists are loving Colour de Verres round bead molds and our wide selection holey molds. We are also seeing a growing interest in bottle art. Bottle art is everywhere on social networks and in our artist gallery. Artists have dedicated entire Pinterest pin boards to Bottle Art (Delphi included). Number one on our list is the Craig Mitchell Smith 7-Piece Floral and Foliage mold. Customers are loving its quality and versatility, and Craig is becoming quite the celebrity. Check out the list for other notable favorites. Whats your favorite product so far this year? 1. Craig Mitchell Smith Floral and

Transform Your Garden Into a Fairytale with Glass

Transform Your Garden Into a Fairytale with Glass Fairytales, folklore and fantasy provide endless inspiration for garden art. With a little imagination and a few enchanting elements, you can turn your back yard into a magical playground for kids (and grown ups too. ) In researching fairy tale garden art for this blog, I ran across many inspiring images and stories. One artist created a magical garden where stone mermaids rested near a cool stream and pixies perched on trees. Another artist added tiny wooden doors and windows to the base of the trees in her garden, much to the delight of the wee folk. Besides wood and stone, glass is also a wonderful medium for creating magical details like toadstools, bird baths, wind chimes and more. Create a slumped fairy house to tuck in a shady spot, or a table-top fountain to sit under the sun. Fused flowers in brilliant colors provide year-round cheer to pots

Bedazzled Earrings: A Microwave Fusing Project

Bedazzled Earrings: A Microwave Fusing Project By Rita Levine Skill Level 2 (Adult 1-5 1 being the easiest, 5 being most difficult) Time to Complete 45 Minutes Materials Fuseworks Kiln Fuseworks Kiln Paper Fuseworks Glass Cutter Wheeled Glass Nippers Ruler Westrim pearl assortment Sterling Silver Plated Square Cabochon Mini Links - Delphi 85435 2 hat pins Earring wires Scrap fusing glass 90 COE Chain-nose pliers Round-nose pliers Instructions 1. Place white glass on a clean flat cutting surface with the smooth side of the glass facing towards you. 2. Start on an edge of the glass holding the cutter firmly in one hand. Keep the cutter perpendicular to the glass. Push the cutter gently and evenly across the glass. Decrease pressure slightly as you reach the opposite edge of the glass; lift the cutter off the glass at the end. 3. Breaking the score line can be done with breaking pliers. Hold the glass in

Beginner's Notes: Making Glass Feathers

Beginner's Notes: Making Glass Feathers The Feathers of the Phoenix Plate is the most complex plate I have made so far.Making the glass feathers and fusing the plate is an 8-step process. It starts with a glass brick that is fused from layers of transparent and opal glass dammed between four kiln bricks. The brick is then sawed in half and bookended, then fused again. After fusing, the brick is sawed into thin slices with a round diamond bladed Taurus 3 glass saw. The slices are again bookended together and fused with a piece of clear glass on top. All the glass feathers turn out beautifully and never look the same. They can be used in jewelry and plates. The feathers are laid out on a black piece of opal glass and fused flat. Then a transparent piece of glass is placed on top, and the plate undergoes another 12-hour fusing. The last step

Glaskoben Ornaments: On Trend This Holiday Season

Glaskoben Ornaments: On Trend This Holiday Season Deck the halls with boughs of holly is really more than just lyrics from a popular holiday song. Each year my family and I always try to do something new and creative that will make memories for years to come. When I started my search internationally on whats new for Christmas 2010, I noticed a very obvious trend appearing all over. The round shape of the traditional ornament is very much in vogue. The real difference however is creating unique, one of a kind glass orbs to be enjoyed and admired. This year for Christmas 2010, we have a very special project that your entire family can assist in making. These beautiful GLASKOLBENS will be cherished and admired by friends and family alike. Ideas and suggestions for displaying your Glaskolbens 1. Arrange a variety of colors in your favorite bowl and instantly it becomes a show stopping centerpiece. 2.

Household Items You Can Use As Tools

Household Items You Can Use As Tools From our Facebook fans, here are a few household items that can be used as tools in art glass creation. Some great ideas here. Hairspray for gluing (the non-aerosol kind, the cheaper, the better. ) Olive oil for your glass cutter The spoony straw from a slush puppie for pouring small amounts of frit Butter knives for bead making Chinese take out containers for storing smaller pieces of fusable glass. They are rectangular and stack well with a clear lid. Also, the soup containers to store frit (each size of frit in its own container stacked within the others of like color and only the top one needs a lid, and they are clear) Glass yogurt pots for storing frit and other bits Plastic containers that tubs of crystal light comes in for storing smaller pieces of glass. I also save the tubs for mixing glue/water, frit and water, paint,

Glass Garden Art by our Facebook Fans

Glass Garden Art by our Facebook Fans I am often inspired by the glass work of our customers and Facebook fans. They are always thinking outside the box and using Delphi products in new and interesting ways. Recently we asked our fans to send us photos of glass art from their very own back yards. We received so many amazing projects, we decided to share a few here on our blog. Joleen Siebert, of Magic Gardens Stained Glass, created these two beautiful stained glass Koi fish panels (top left and at right). The larger panel is made up of 120 pieces of Spectrum, Kokomo and Bullseye glass. The smaller panel is made up of 40 pieces of Spectrum and scrap glass. It is framed in copper tubing. Both are foil construction. She designed these pieces from a spectrum pattern and adaptations of photos she found online. Mark Hall of Hallmark Glass created a whimsical birdbath (at left)

Stained Glass News March 2013 Edition - 5 Hot Products for Spring

Stained Glass News March 2013 Edition - 5 Hot Products for Spring Heres our list of the 5 hottest new and featured items from the March 2013 of Stained Glass News 1. Creators Premium Bottle Cutter What can the makers of the popular Cutters Mate and Beetle Bits Cutting Systems do with a bottle cutter? It turns out - A LOT. They have designed a premium, top-of-the-line bottle cutter that is sturdy, easy to use and gives superior results. We love the special features on the Creators Bottle Cutter, especially the aluminum slide bar ruler which makes cutting precise sizes a cinch, and the adjustable carbide cutting wheel so getting perfect pressure for an even score is a breeze. Want to learn more? See how it works with step-by-step photos and instruction. 2. Once You Try an Electric Mandrel Spinner, You Will Wonder How You Ever Created Beads Without One. With the Electric Mandrel Spinner, you will free yourself from arm

Mosaics: Piecing It All Together

Mosaics: Piecing It All Together Mosaics add charm and whimsy to any room in your home or corner of your garden. Mosaics are not only beautiful to display, but they are truly a lot of fun to make. Traditional mosaics are made by cutting tiny pieces of glass and fitting them together with just enough space between each piece for grout. Traditions change, however, and todays contemporary mosaics are not only made from glass but broken china pieces, buttons, shells and even Grandmas rhinestone jewelry. To begin, choose an item on which to mosaic- fountains, small bistro tables and stepping stones are good starting places, but generally mosaics can be applied to any and all surfaces. If youve chosen a smooth surface, rough it up first using fine grit sandpaper or score it using a craft knife. A rough surface will allow the adhesive to form a better grip. Next, decide on a pattern for

Dragonfly Garden Stake

Dragonfly Garden Stake Lately, Ive been spending a lot of time in my backyard. My father (a retired horticulture professor and perpetual gardener) has been preparing my quarter-acre lot for a vegetable garden. As soon as I saw this project guide, I could envision stained glass dragonflies peeking out amidst my beans and greens. They are perfect for adding a little sparkle to your summer landscape. DOWNLOAD THE PATTERN HERE Materials Wissmach Sky Blue and Crystal Stream X for Wings, 1/2 Sq. Ft. (or other glass color of choice) Wissmach Dark Blue/Medium Green Opal for Body, 1/3 Sq. Ft. (or other glass color of choice) Flux Solder 7/32 Copper Foil 20-, 22-, and 16-Gauge Copper Wire 2 Small Green Nuggets 1/8 Copper or Brass Rod Black Patina Directions This is one of many of the garden stake designs in Leslie Gibbs book, Garden Art in Glass. There is a lot more information

Ramona Martin: Making Something from Nothing

Ramona Martin: Making Something from Nothing How did you get started in glass? I originally just did tile mosaics and then a friend sent me info on taking a class at Delphi for fused glass mosaics taught by Christine Stewart. I was hooked and had my own kiln within a few months. Why glass? Its infinitely easier than working with ceramic tile. I like the way the fused glass lets me incorporate rounded shapes with the hard edges of cut glass. Why is recycling important to you? I always take everyones leftovers tile, glass, wire, rocks, beads because you never know what project you can use even the smallest pieces in. Then you can elaborate my friend gave me that, my neighbor was throwing that away. Im currently working with the Michigan Chapter of the IIDA and ZeroLandfill where they divert architectural samples from the landfill for upcycling. Its a wonderful way to get free

A Creative Resolution: How to Use Holey Molds

A Creative Resolution: How to Use Holey Molds The holiday season is over. The ham has been eaten and all your resolutions have been made (and probably broken). The time for making and giving out all your large and time consuming presents has passed...now what? Creatively stunted? Need a change of pace or something that is easy, simple yet stunning? I know around this time of the year, I sure do. I need an activity that has a fast turn around time and the oomph to push me to create more. Sometimes just the act of creating can push you kicking and screaming through a creative block. Enter the fun (and inexpensive) holey molds. What a perfect way to use up scrap glass AND to produce a baseline piece from which to creatively expand upon. The best part? As the name denotes...they fuse with the hold already MADE - no messy, time consuming drilling. (Which, in the dead

ZN Stained Glass: Capturing Creativity

ZN Stained Glass: Capturing Creativity Think of it this way youre attempting to capture something that doesnt actually exist. A mythical creature that can change shape, even meaning at any given time; and youre expected to do it, again and again, over and over, til the end of time. Sounds all kinds of easy, right? Its actually about as easy as it sounds. Creativity is the mythical creature, Im the person thats supposed to capture it. Thats my life as an artist. More specifically, a stained glass artist. My love of glass started at a very young age--the exact age doesnt matter--but I know I was short enough to be patted on the top of my curly head by hundreds of people while they called me small boy since I was too painfully shy to introduce myself. I was dragged through hundreds of cathedrals and museums here and abroad. I saw the works of