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Cutting a Pattern Properly

Cutting a Pattern Properly When cutting out a pattern, where do you cut? With the proper scissors, is it on the line or left or right of the line? If, by proper scissors, you mean the three-bladed pattern shears, you want to cut by placing the center blade of the shears right on pattern line. The two outside blades will then cut the pattern on either side of the center blade. This removes a small strip of paper between each of the pattern pieces. You need to make sure youre using the right shears for the method of construction youve decided to use. Foil shears allow for two thicknesses of copper foil. Lead shears have a thicker center blade which allows for the heart of lead came. If you are using regular scissors (that dont have the extra blade) you will need to cut twice, once on each side of the line, for your

Beginner's Notes: Achieve a Stained Glass Look in Fusing

Beginner's Notes: Achieve a Stained Glass Look in Fusing I saw a free stained glass pattern in the Delphi newsletter that I just loved. I knew if I made it into a stained glass panel, I wouldnt be able to eat off of it. So I set out to create a fused glass platter instead. My husband and I decided to cut all the pattern pieces by hand (thinking about it later, I would have used my Delphi Taurus 3 glass saw). We sandwiched all the fusible pieces between two sheets of transparent 96 COE glass. In the end, I didnt have the heart to slump it into its mold. I made a channel on each side with fiber paper foam and transparent glass, to hang it with.(I have learned to double the channels for the wire loop.) There were some bubbles due to our handcutting and gaps, so the second fusing got rid of some of those. During

Using Finger Fids for Foiling

Using Finger Fids for Foiling Foiling and crimping. Most glass people either hate it or love it. Its one of those jobs that just has to get done one way or the other. Foiling glass is a no brainer, and the technique can be mastered in a matter of minutes, but crimpingwell , lets just say that it has its variations. One method that I picked up from the productions shop I first worked in has always proved to be the quickest and most efficient Finger fids. Whats a finger fid? What youll need 1. Masking tape 2. Your fingers Step One Extend the thumb, index and middle fingers of the hand you usually crimp your foil with; or if you use a fid, the hand you usually hold your fid with. Step Two Cut about ten short strips of masking tape approximately 3 long. Step Three Beginning with any one of your fingers, wrap

Paper Under Glass-Momma Mosaics' Signature Style

Paper Under Glass-Momma Mosaics' Signature Style When Charity Stewarts mosaic mirror made of old Starbucks Gift Cards was posted to our Artist Gallery as part of our Recycled Arts Contest, I couldnt help but notice. Cheerily nicknamed Momma Mosaics, Charity creates brightly colored art that is whimsical and playful. She has mastered the art of using paper under glass, and repurposing found objects. We caught up with her to ask her a few questions about her signature style. How did you get started in glass? I discovered the joy of glass at the age of 12, when I was introduced to stained glass art by my grandmother. She inspired me to explore my creative side as we worked side-by-side in her tiny basement studio, cutting and grinding pieces for a large window panel. Those lessons in creativity launched my interest in glass art and eventually led me to classes in fusing and mosaics. Why mosaics? Have

Donna Sarafis: Inspiration from Within

Donna Sarafis: Inspiration from Within Loving glass and loving to talk about glass and art are two of my favorite things to do. What I will be sharing with others and what others ask me about most often will be the subjects of my blogs for Delphi. But my first thought is always to one issue that I believe causes crafters, artists, and those who wish they could make something beautiful to stay on the side lines and possibly never take a class or open a book. It is this issue that often defeats us before we even start. It is a belief that we have no talent which often brings on a fear of failure. I have heard over and over again, Im just not artistic (artsy, crafty, talented, gifted, good at). If you have ever felt that way, then you need to hear this. At one time, I felt the same way. Oh

Clayton Stang: Out of the Shadows

Clayton Stang: Out of the Shadows We first noticed the work of Clayton Stang in Delphi's Artist Gallery. His glass shadowbox "Night Owl" received many comments in our gallery and on Facebook. Artists were asking, "how did he do that?" We tracked him down for a short Q&A. How did you get started in glass? I was the baker at an adult summer camp 13 years ago. They were offering stained glass classes. I took to it immediately. Two years later, I became the stained glass instructor at the camp. Why glass? I was a color stylist in animation for years, so the colors of glass called out to me. Sometimes I just go into the glass store and look at glass for the thrill of it. Ive always loved stained glass. I just had to wait until I grew up and could afford it. How have your other interests/hobbies/career influenced your

How Your Glass Art Can Help Others After a Natural Disaster

How Your Glass Art Can Help Others After a Natural Disaster First it was Texas with Hurricane Harvey. Then just a couple weeks later, the entire state of Florida was engulfed with vicious Hurricane Irma. Both hurricanes left devastation in their wake with total destruction of property, flooding, and even claiming lives. It’s been a rough few weeks for the south of the country, but the spirit of the people affected is strong, even if many areas are still without electricity while the outside temperatures continue to climb. For those affected, hurricanes can be traumatic even if no loss of lives or property has taken place. It hammers away at the spirit and brings about more stress. Plus for many, it keeps them out of work with no way to make up the losses. For those that weren’t in the path of either hurricane though, it gives the opportunity to lend a helping hand. One great way to make

Mark Hall: Leaving His Mark on the Glass World

Mark Hall: Leaving His Mark on the Glass World We recently asked our Facebook fans to send us photos of glass art from their gardens. We received some especially interesting photos from glass artist Mark Hall. Impressed as we were, we realized that Marks talent goes far beyond the confines of his garden. He is self-taught and has mastered German leading techniques, hand beveling, mirroring and sandblasting among other techniques. He fine-tuned hisskills while studying abroad in Germany at Derix Glass Studio,at Pilchuck School of Glass in Washington, andwith The Studio at the Corning Museum of Glass in New York. He and his wife, Leslie, now work together at Hallmark Glass. How did you get started in glass? In 1976 my brother informed me hed started a business, and I was his partner. Surprised, I asked, Whats our business? He responded, Stained glass. I knew nothing about it, so I learned how to make a window on our first

Stained Glass News May 2013 Edition

Stained Glass News May 2013 Edition Heres our list of 5 Favorite New Items from the May 2013 edition of Stained Glass News, also in this issue Stained Glass News 25th Anniversary Contest winners announced. 1. Button Molds from Creative Paradise What better way to show off your art, than to wear it. These fantastic new molds from Creative Paradise are available in three different styles, Small Round, Large Round, and Square giving you the freedom to create buttons for any apparel in your closet. We love creating glass art and what a bonus when it is practical too. 2. Getting the Blues can be Great - 2 Exciting New Colors from Spectrum Glass Expand your creative pallet with the latest hues from our friends at Spectrum Glass. Blue Topaz and Hydrangea Opal bring to life two of our favorite shades from nature, perfect for portraying bright ocean blues and subtle floral hues. These colors