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Studio News: Tips for Using Frit Molds

Studio News: Tips for Using Frit Molds Frit Molds are becoming increasingly more popular, especially with all the new styles of jewelry molds coming out. Getting a beautiful finished project can be tricky at times. Issue #1 Glass tends to stick; and create sharp daggers on the sides of the glass project. This can happen when the glass separator is getting thin or worn away. Boron Nitride MR-97 is the answer. It is a versatile product that can also be used on stainless steel molds as well. Think of it like teflon on your frying pan. It will not allow the glass to stick to the mold. Projects pop right out and are ready to wear. You do have to follow the instructions and reapply as directed. Watch a video on how to use Boron Nitride MR-97. However if you do get spurs on the sides of your project, simply use a wet hand sanding pad

Household Items You Can Use As Tools

Household Items You Can Use As Tools From our Facebook fans, here are a few household items that can be used as tools in art glass creation. Some great ideas here. Hairspray for gluing (the non-aerosol kind, the cheaper, the better. ) Olive oil for your glass cutter The spoony straw from a slush puppie for pouring small amounts of frit Butter knives for bead making Chinese take out containers for storing smaller pieces of fusable glass. They are rectangular and stack well with a clear lid. Also, the soup containers to store frit (each size of frit in its own container stacked within the others of like color and only the top one needs a lid, and they are clear) Glass yogurt pots for storing frit and other bits Plastic containers that tubs of crystal light comes in for storing smaller pieces of glass. I also save the tubs for mixing glue/water, frit and water, paint,

Necessity is the Mother of Invention

Necessity is the Mother of Invention Ever wondered what goes in to developing a new craft tool or product? The post below was submitted by Rita Levine of Diamond Tech International. She leads readers on a journey through the product development phases of the new G2 Bottle Cutter. Last Spring I was invited to join a group of friends for a little eco crafting. Little did I know that two months later I would be working to design a new bottle cutter. We worked hard that day to embrace our eco-friendly projects. Our goal was to transform bottles into art. It was clear, however, the bottle cutters we were using were not cutting it. We struggled to score and separate our bottles with very little success. It was then I thought, There has got to be a better way. So I rounded up our product development team and we set out to create a tool that

Combining Fabric or Paper with Your Glass

Combining Fabric or Paper with Your Glass Did you know that you can sandwich fabric (or paper) between glass just like you do with pressed flowers? It sure opens up a lot of possibilities for creating one-of-a-kind projects. Heres how 1 Cut two pieces of thin clear glass (ideally, single strength or thinner) to match your pattern piece. Dull the edges of each piece, if necessary, with a fine grinder bit or scythe stone. 2 Carefully clean the surfaces of these pieces that will be on the inside of the sandwich. Once you have sandwiched the fabric inside the glass, you wont be able to clean the glass again. 3 Cut a piece of fabric to match the glass pieces you cut. 4 To create your sandwich, place the fabric on the bottom piece of glass (clean side up). Add the top piece of glass (clean side down). Now hold your sandwich together with a couple of

Glass Fusing Q&A

Glass Fusing Q&A No oneknowstheexactorigins of glass fusing although there is evidence that the Egyptians were familiar withrudimentary techniques. The Romans however arenoted by scholars for developingrefined glass fusing skills. Although technology has changed the way modern glass fuserswork,the technique isessentially the same as those developed by the Romans centuries ago. The basic technique involvesstacking two or morelayers of fusible glass, which are then placed in a kiln and gradually heated to between 1450-1500 Fahrenheit.At these temperatures the layers of glass fuse, or melt together and become one. Unfortunately, glass kilnsare large andexpensive,whichkeeps most Hobbyists from pursuing this art form. Now there are new kiln options, including theThe Fuseworks Microwave Kiln. This device works in most household microwaves and can fuse glass in about 3 minutes. Here are some common questions we get on fusing in this modern-day kiln. The following are Q A complied by Diamond Tech, the manufacturer of Fuseworks

Fused Stained Glass Pendant

Fused Stained Glass Pendant Sometimes necessity is the mother of invention, and sometimes invention comes when you have nothing to lose. Early in my career, I had three metal-clay-and-fused-glass pendants fail in a single day. The glass cabochons simply shattered and fell away from the silver after the pieces were fired because I had neglected to cut an expansion hole underneath the cabochons. Augghh. Lesson learned. But now I was left with three ugly pieces of silver, each with small pieces of glass permanently fused into bizarre locations on the surfacea loss I could not afford. Weeks later, after tryingunsuccessfully to remove the glass, I decided to try fusing glass in patterns onto the surface of the pendants. The results were surprising, and the Stained Glass process was born This technique begins with any fired metal clay with a flat surface. Small shards of fusible glass are then attached to the silver. After