Silver On Clear Granite Ripple - 96 COE

Unit Size* Price Qty 
4" square 4" x 4" $25.95 USD
1/4 sheet 8" x 8" $69.95
sheet 19" x 19" $250.95

Item# X4124
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.


Product Description

Dichroic glass creates dazzling color that changes right before your eyes! By viewing it at different angles, backgrounds and lighting you see two distinctly different colors. This glass also features a deeply rippled texture for even more dramatic appeal. Perfect for custom jewelry or larger fusing projects, try textured dichroic glass into your next work of art!

Available in 4" x 4" squares, quarter sheets, and full sheets. Quarter sheets are about 8" x 8" with a curved edge. Full sheets have a 19" diameter. 96 COE. Colors here are shown for black dichroic reflected.

Photo above is a general representation of glass colors. Colors may vary. Sizes are Approximate.

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Apr 03, 2012
I am always trying to save my scraps, even if they are metal. I grind my glass, pin backs and bails with my dremel tool (Ive found that they stay glued together much better that way), and I started saving all of the grinding scraps. I save the sterling silver grindings in one bottle, and my gold plate with mixed metals, in another. One day, I was looking at some old green sea glass lying on the beach. I thought about folks sending notes out in a bottle, and it being found miles away, full of sand on a beach. I wondered if I could capture that idea in a pendant. When I got home I put those ground metals to use. First, I cut one square of transparent glass, then a smaller square of aqua-green transparent glass, and a tiny square of transparent glass. I sprinkled some of the
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Sometimes necessity is the mother of invention, and sometimes invention comes when you have nothing to lose. Early in my career, I had three metal-clay-and-fused-glass pendants fail in a single day. The glass cabochons simply shattered and fell away from the silver after the pieces were fired because I had neglected to cut an expansion hole underneath the cabochons. Augghh. Lesson learned. But now I was left with three ugly pieces of silver, each with small pieces of glass permanently fused into bizarre locations on the surfacea loss I could not afford. Weeks later, after tryingunsuccessfully to remove the glass, I decided to try fusing glass in patterns onto the surface of the pendants. The results were surprising, and the Stained Glass process was born This technique begins with any fired metal clay with a flat surface. Small shards of fusible glass are then attached to the silver. After
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The Ring of Fire Artist Challenge, lasting from May-June, sparked the interest of artists of varied media all across the country. While Delphi received entries of paper, glass, ceramics, wire, jewelry, etc., it was a select group of 10 products that united them all. Every eligible entry incorporated at least one of 10 unique products making up the Ring of Fire. These products included copper metal mesh, millifiori, clear glaze, dichroic scrap, recycled glass tiles, metallic tiles, color slide, krafty blok, fine silver wire and pressed flowers. Below is a complete list of contest winners. Congratulations to Grand Prize winner of the Jen-Ken Deluxe EZ-Pro Kiln, Kristin Simpson, with her Garden Whimsie entry. Also, congratulations to Lisa Norvell for her Mountain Meadow Surprise entry which will be featured in an upcoming Delphi catalog. Stay tuned for other great contests like this one in the near future. Delphi Awards Delphis