12" Round Screen Melt Set

$83.95 USD
Item# 96301
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.


Product Description

Turn your fusible scrap glass into gorgeous kiln melts. Use to create stunning platters, or cold work melts into tiles and cabochons. The set includes a 12" in diameter heavy-gauge stainless steel ring and mesh screen. (Kiln posts sold separately.) To use, simply place the melt set in the kiln on top of kiln posts, place ceramic fiber paper in the bottom, pile scrap glass onto the screen and fire your melt. Includes instructions.

Screen melt bowl by artist Thomas Stout from Delphi's Online Artist Gallery, other images courtesy of Master Artisan Products™. For more details on this product click "View User Manual".

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Mar 23, 2012
Im always looking for ways to use my scrap, so I decided to give the round screen melt set a try. I had mixed feelings about it, because I made the mistake of not following the fusing schedule, and tried to wing it with my pre-programmed kiln. Despite the error of my ways, I ended up with some very pretty glass using two colors of opal art glass scraps. With my screen melt complete, I used a Sharpie pen to trace out my images, and began cutting them with my Taurus 3 Ring Saw. Once I finished the shapes, I put the pendants and purse hangars back in my skutt Firebox 14 kiln, for a fire polish on the slow tack fuse. Some got bails, some wire wrapping, and the others were epoxied to purse hangers. Looking back, If you follow the Delphi directions labeled as users manual in the
Mar 23, 2012
Im always looking for ways to use my scrap, so I decided to give the round screen melt set a try. I had mixed feelings about it, because I made the mistake of not following the fusing schedule, and tried to wing it with my pre-programmed kiln. Despite the error of my ways, I ended up with some very pretty glass using two colors of opal art glass scraps. With my screen melt complete, I used a Sharpie pen to trace out my images, and began cutting them with my Taurus 3 Ring Saw. Once I finished the shapes, I put the pendants and purse hangars back in my skutt Firebox 14 kiln, for a fire polish on the slow tack fuse. Some got bails, some wire wrapping, and the others were epoxied to purse hangers. Looking back, If you follow the Delphi directions labeled as users manual in the