Vicki Gillespie

Vicki Gillespie

Vicki has over 24 years of experience in the stained glass industry, first teaching and managing a retail stained glass store, then as project coordinator for SGN Publishing, working with designers to prepare their books for print. Finally, after working with Stained Glass News since its inception, Vicki is now the publisher and editor-in-chief and continues to inspire and entertain stained glass, hot glass and mosaic artists with five full-color issues each year. "Here at SGN, we love to hear from our readers, so why not share your latest project or hint with us? It's easy‚Ķ just email us at [email protected] and you might see your project or hint in print."

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How to Use Two Pieces of Mirror Back-To-Back

How-To
Can I use two pieces of mirror back to back in a window so it will look nice from both sides? Yes, you can. Like any pieces of mirror you use in a panel, youll want to use a sealant of some kind (ask your supplier for a recommendation) on the edges and back side of each piece before placing them back to back. The sealant is used to help prevent black rot a discoloring of the mirror caused when something nasty, most likely the flux , gets between the mirrored surface and the glass itself. The sealant is applied after youve cut and ground each piece of mirror to its final shape. Once the mirrors are cut and sealed, hold them back to back and wrap a wide foil (probably 3/8 if youre using 1/8 thick mirror) around the edge of both pieces together. You now have a piece thats 1/4 thick. Keep this in mind when you solder it in place because its going to stick out on one side of your panel or the other (or a little on both sides). I hope you werent planning to construct this window with lead, because itll be hard to find a came appropriate for the job. Another option is to use front surface mirror . Its reflective on both sides so you dont need to plate two pieces togethe

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Working with Stained Glass on a Schedule

Business Tips
My time is limited and I can only work in 2-4 hour intervals. Are there any preventative steps that I should take to assure that my work will be in good shape when I return? Many hobbyists find themselves in the same position, and this is a very good question. We cant cover every possible scenario, but hopefully we can help. Obviously, there are areas where it wont make any difference if you get interrupted. For instance, pattern prep, glass cutting, fitting, and grinding. However, if you do find that you need to stop in the middle of applying copper foil, youll need to think about how long it will be until you can resume the job. If it will only be a few days, there isnt anything special that youll need to do. But if it will be longer than that (or you live in a particularly humid area), your foil may show signs of oxidation when you return. (Oxidation happens to metal when its exposed to the air. It can prevent a nice solder job, so its important to avoid it, or at least know how to clean it up.) To keep oxidation to a minimum, store the foiled pieces in a plastic zipper bag, or cover them as well as you can with plastic wrap. This will limit the amount of air that ca

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