Steampunk Under Glass

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Description:

My eldest daughter was the model for this steampunk-themed piece. Spectrum glass and Reusche paints went into my most involved glass painting project to date.

Art Glass Festival 2014 entry

mw_guthrie

Saturday, April 19, 2014
5 Posts
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@ProfPounds1 Thanks! Seeing other views/photos really does show it off better and makes it look all the more impressive. Thanks also for the insight into your working process (illustrator, etc.), your graphic design skills really show through and make your work unique. I, too, plan to use screen printing in future glass designs (as well as painting). I have already taken a class and learned the process but need to invest in the equipment before I can really put what I learned to use. Looking forward to seeing your future work and happy glass crafting!

ProfPounds1

Saturday, April 19, 2014
12 Posts
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@mw_guthrie As you requested, a few more photos. The design may look like Illustrator because I do my original design in Illustrator and then print out two copies of the finished pattern on a large format printer, one to go on my homesote board and one to cut up. Elsewhere in my gallery you will see a piece of a girl holding an umbrella. The black line work for that one was done with a calligraphy pen, since I do not like using a brush. For my next piece, the window with the two girls, I experimented with a silkscreen process, which allowed me to better control the quality of the lines. For this steampunk piece I was able to perfect the silkscreen process for doing the black lines and also try my hand at doing some shading with other paint colors. Since I have the summers off from teaching I may post a Youtube video in the next couple of months detailing how I do all this. Thanks for your comments.

mw_guthrie

Saturday, April 19, 2014
5 Posts
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Congratulations, the judges definitely chose the clear winner (unlike others, ahem). Great design and execution. One small suggestion, though. More photos! We can't see the actual window, frame, context, it's size, etc. This one and only photo almost looks like this could be a digital image done in illustrator and not an actual window (please take this as a compliment!).

ProfPounds1

Saturday, April 19, 2014
12 Posts
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@TripleR Doing glass painting right is a huge investment in time and materials. I was fortunate enough to have a very accomplished glass painter in the area who gave me some lessons, otherwise I would never have been able to figure it out on my own. The paint itself is very expensive. They come as a powder, actually ground up glass, and a one-pound jar will run anywhere from $80 for black to $2200 for purple (which is made with gold). Most of them are in the $90 to $140 range per color. You can't mix it to get different colors like you can with regular paint, you have to buy each color you want separately. The powder is mixed with clove oil to do the line work with a very fine brush, then it is fired in a kiln to 1250 degrees to make it a permanent part of the glass. To do large color areas you mix the powder with water and use a large blender brush to try and make it smooth before it dries. If you do not put a binding agent such as gum arabic in with the water the dried paint is only very loosely affixed to the glass. This allows you to go back with a brush and rub some of the paint off using a stippling technique to create lighter areas of shading. This will go into the kiln once again to anneal the new layer of color onto the base glass. It is sort of like doing glazes in traditional oil painting...lots of thin layers, one on top of the other, to build up rich colors. My teacher said she will often run one piece of glass through the kiln 20 times to get the effects she wants. There are more craft type glass paints out there, but they are not permanent and they will fade over time if you put your window in the sun, so I never really explored them. With the cost of paints, brushes and a kiln I would say I have put at least $2500 into supplies and went through a fair amount of glass experimenting with different techniques such as silkscreening. I don't really think you can pick it up from reading books or looking at videos, you really need to learn from someone who can show you how to do this in person. It opens up some really cool design possibilities, especially for someone like me who has been trained as a professional graphic designer rather than a fine artist, but you really have to want to do it and be willing to spend a lot of money and a lot of time to do half way decent work. Hope this helps you to decide what you want to do. Regards, Dave

ProfPounds1

Saturday, April 19, 2014
12 Posts
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@TripleR

TripleR

Saturday, April 19, 2014
3 Posts
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@TripleR Adding on....I see you are an artist, read your bio. Urrrgh....I might be getting too ambitious. Terrible situation when you have ideas but don't know how to apply them :/

TripleR

Saturday, April 19, 2014
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That is fabulous! I have several projects I would like to use paint with and I am having a hard time committing to a brand and type. What base does Reusche come in? What did you use? Did you mix the types? I presume they had to be fired. Are you a classically trained artist or did you utilize a technique video? I just love the details!!! I have two nudes I am sitting on and a piece that combines the Baltimore Oriole and Raven birds that would look fabulous done with paint. Sorry....blahahahah If you have an opportunity I would be interested in picking your brain on these and other questions.

ProfPounds1

Saturday, April 19, 2014
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@MBalakStudios Thank you for your kind words. Your work is quite good too. I don't have nearly your experience building windows. I took a class in college during the late 70s, made half a dozen windows, and then moved on to other artistic pursuits. I picked it up again two years ago. "Steampunk" is my fifth window since I started again. The piece I am working on next is an adaptation of Alphonse Mucha's "Job" poster. Lots of painting involved, so it should take me most of the summer to finish it.

MBalakStudios

Friday, April 18, 2014
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Congratulations on your well deserved win, this piece is really beautifully done, love your design and paintwork on this piece. Michael.