1-3/8" x 6' Oak Framing Stock

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$29.95 USD
Item# 5621N
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • Oak framing stock for making custom frames
  • High-quality hardwood has a smooth sanded finish
  • Routed to accept all "U" channel came
  • Any "U" came ΒΌ" or smaller will be hidden in the channel
  • Made in the U.S.A.


Product Description

Frame your stained glass projects in this oak framing stock for an elegant finishing touch. High-quality hardwood comes in sections six feet long with a channel 3/8" deep and 5/16" wide. Sanded smooth, routed, and ready for you to apply the finish. Other widths and lengths available.
Sold by the piece. Special handling charge of $6.95 applies per order.

Tips for Making Wood Frames for Stained Glass Beginning with the size of your finished panel, add the miter allowance to get the correct outside size to cut the frame:
 

  • 1" wide frame stock: add 1-5/16"
  • 1-3/8" wide frame stock: add 2-1/16"
  • 2" wide frame stock: add 3-5/16"

Use framing screws #8845 for the corners. Following the package directions, drill corner holes and insert screws.

Delphi Tips: To prevent the sideways "drift" or "stepping" you may experience when assembling the frame, just place a C-clamp covering both mitered edges. Keep it snug – but not too tight, and insert screw.

Side Mount Hooks #8841 are a strong and secure method of hanging framed stained glass panels.

Bevel panel by artist George Ayars. Rose and bevel accent panels by artist Denny Berkery. Both from "300 Stained Glass Cabinet Door Designs" book #6078.
Santa panel by artist Keturah Guzinski.

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Pros : Beautiful wood to frame stain glass
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