Bullseye Opaque White Double Rolled - 90 COE

Unit Size* Price Qty 
small 8" x 10" $16.65 USD
medium 10" x 16" $33.25
large 16" x 20" $66.45

Item# B001330
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • Double rolled to minimize bubbles
  • Good for fusing, stained glass and mosaic projects
  • Consistent Pattern and Texture
  • Premium Handmade Glass

Product Description

Create with Premium Bullseye Glass!
Bullseye's brightest, most opaque white ever offered as a standard color. Premium handmade Bullseye glass is ideal for high-quality kiln work. Specifically formulated and tested for compatibility, this glass withstands multiple firings for complex projects without devitrification. The flatter double-rolled surface minimizes bubble entrapment, so colors can be layered for custom hues. A subtle "catspaw" texture allows modest light transmission when used in stained glass projects, creating an organic look.

The Standard thickness is 3 mm. 90 COE. 

Photo above is a general representation of glass colors. Colors may vary. Sizes are Approximate.

Customer Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
5 star  
  1
4 star
  0
3 star
  0
2 star
  0
1 star
  0
See all customer reviews
Write a customer review

Product Images from Customers

Be the first to share product images with other customers
5 out of 5 stars
  •   Pure white
By on
Pros : A beautiful, snowy, pure white that's a dream to cut and grind
Cons :
Was this review helpful to you?  

See all customer reviews
Related Content
Apr 04, 2012
Before I was fortunate enough to own a kiln, I used to experiment with all kinds of polymer clay using recipes for faux gemstones. It was fun and inexpensive. While giving a fused glass lesson the other day, I said, Hey, lets try to make some faux opals. So, we crushed up some green and orange, clear backed dichroic glass (from the Uroboros Magic Box), and mixed in a tiny bit of crushed opaque white glass. We cut two transparent ovals, covered them with Bullseye Glastac Firing Glue, and sprinkled on the frit. We added another layer of glue and piled up some more frit. The beauty of this glue is that you can use as much as you want. I love it for holding the frit on the edges of bowls and glass. The fired pieces looked like opal cabochons. To make the cabochons more opaque, I used my
Sep 20, 2010
Sometimes necessity is the mother of invention, and sometimes invention comes when you have nothing to lose. Early in my career, I had three metal-clay-and-fused-glass pendants fail in a single day. The glass cabochons simply shattered and fell away from the silver after the pieces were fired because I had neglected to cut an expansion hole underneath the cabochons. Augghh. Lesson learned. But now I was left with three ugly pieces of silver, each with small pieces of glass permanently fused into bizarre locations on the surfacea loss I could not afford. Weeks later, after tryingunsuccessfully to remove the glass, I decided to try fusing glass in patterns onto the surface of the pendants. The results were surprising, and the Stained Glass process was born This technique begins with any fired metal clay with a flat surface. Small shards of fusible glass are then attached to the silver. After