Black Glass & Metal Enamel Pen - 30 Ml

$10.95 USD
Item# 68128
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

  • Create with Milton Bridge enamels for Delphi
  • Affordable quality - only 25% the cost of traditional enamels
  • Long lasting pre-mixed formula doesn't dry out in pens
  • Enamels can be mixed for an unlimited range of rich custom colors
  • Color matures upon firing
  • Fire on glass at 1382 - 1450 degrees F, fire on metal at 1450 - 1562 degrees F
  • Sold in 30 ml tubes


Product Description

exclusive Create with Milton Bridge Enamels for Delphi
Add brilliantly colored details to your glass and metal art. Enamels are pre-mixed eliminating the mess and guess-work of mixing to get the correct ratio - colors are already suspended in a liquid base that applies smoothly, fires cleanly and will not dry out in the pen. Apply enamels directly to your glass or metal project from the pen, or use a palette to mix custom colors and apply with a brush for different brushstroke techniques. 30 ml bottle.

Allow enamels to dry completely before firing. Enamels become glossy and mature in color when fired. Note: Fired enamel colors may appear different from pre-fired colors. Color swatch shows approximate post-fire color. Fire in a kiln between 1382° - 1450° for glass. Fire in a kiln between 1450° - 1562° on metal, or fire with a torch.

Recommended by the UK Guild of Enamellers. A Delphi Exclusive!

Tile project by Delphi Artists. Fused glass enamel bowl by artist Dane Porter. Metal enamel jewelry projects by artists Jennifer Bonesteel and Kayleigh Clark. Enamel earrings by artist Steena Gaut.

Customer Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
5 star  
  1
4 star
  0
3 star
  0
2 star
  0
1 star
  0
See all customer reviews
Write a customer review

Product Images from Customers

Be the first to share product images with other customers
5 out of 5 stars
  •   Practical paint
By on
Pros : Great size for adding dots or lines. Easy to grip and control the flow
Cons :
Was this review helpful to you?  

See all customer reviews
Related Content
Apr 03, 2012
I am always trying to save my scraps, even if they are metal. I grind my glass, pin backs and bails with my dremel tool (Ive found that they stay glued together much better that way), and I started saving all of the grinding scraps. I save the sterling silver grindings in one bottle, and my gold plate with mixed metals, in another. One day, I was looking at some old green sea glass lying on the beach. I thought about folks sending notes out in a bottle, and it being found miles away, full of sand on a beach. I wondered if I could capture that idea in a pendant. When I got home I put those ground metals to use. First, I cut one square of transparent glass, then a smaller square of aqua-green transparent glass, and a tiny square of transparent glass. I sprinkled some of the
Jul 21, 2017
As with many things, we have Japan to thank for metal clay art. It first started there in 1990, allowing crafty jewelry makers to create gorgeous and sophisticated pieces without the involved study required to make jewelry out of precious metals. This crafting medium binds small particles of metal like silver, gold, copper or bronze to make into jewelry, beads, or even small sculptures. It’s easy to shape into any form, just like soft clay. You can shape it by hand or with the use of molds. Once it’s dry, it can be fired by kiln, with a handheld torch, or even on your gas stove, though much of it depends on the type of clay as well as the metal that’s mixed into it. As it’s heated, the binder burns off leaving only the metal behind and revealing your beautiful artistic creation. If you’re looking to explore
May 05, 2010
I have some questions about Lead-Free Solder. Does it tarnish over time? Can you use patina on it? Does it flow like regular solder? Is it better than regular solder? We are sure that you arent the only one with these questions. Lets start with the question of whether or not its better than regular solder. Since the harm from lead is caused by ingestion, any project that will come in contact with food or food containers should be made with lead-free solder. In addition, anything that is handled, like jewelry or kaleidoscopes, should be made with lead-free solder. Hands have a terrible habit of making it into the mouth before they get washed. So, yes it is better than regular solder in these situations. As far as working with solder, you should be diligent about cleaning your hands after touching any solder. Dont eat, drink, smoke, or do anything