Metal Tip Applicator Bottles - 3 Pack

$24.95 USD
Item# 92401
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • Three 12oz bottles
  • Small, medium, and large applicator tips


Product Description

Ideal for applying fine detail with Hues 2 Fuse, enamels, etching cream and more. Includes three 1/2 oz. bottles with small, medium and large applicator metal tips.

Project created by artist Stephanie O'Toole.

Customer Reviews

4 out of 5 stars
5 star  
  0
4 star
  1
3 star
  0
2 star
  0
1 star
  0
See all customer reviews
Write a customer review

Product Images from Customers

Be the first to share product images with other customers
4 out of 5 stars
  •   Great for Mica Powders
By on
Pros : These worked well with mica powder mixed with Klyr-Fire. Easy to wash and reuse. Amazing to actually be able to make easy curves and delicate designs in glass!
Cons : I couldn't get powdered frit with Klyr-Fire to work. This might just be my lack of experience. Not sure.
Other Thoughts : Consistency of mix is probably the key and maybe I haven't figured out the right mix for powdered frit yet.
Was this review helpful to you?  
1 of 2 people found this review helpful

See all customer reviews
Related Content
May 04, 2011
One of the biggest trends in jewelry for 2011 is layering. Layering necklaces appears chic without looking stuffy. The key to pulling off this look is combining different textures and lengths. Gone are the days of never mixing gold and silver. Dig through your jewelry box for charms, chains and forgotten items, and wear them together for a fresh look. Necklaces in different metal finishes, a string of pearls, and a brightly colored cabochon make an elegant statement on a plain white t-shirt or LBD. In 2008, we saw this layered look emerge on runways the world over, but it was a subtler approach (perhaps pairing a shorter gold chain with a longer one.) Now, anything goes. To keep it from getting tacky, (you dont want to end up looking like your crazy aunt Marge) follow these tips The chains should be of varying lengths and staggered. Try mixing metals
Aug 13, 2010
In my reading I keep seeing mentions of tinning. What is it, and how do I do it? Tinning is the term used to describe the action of putting a thin coat of solder over something else, for instance copper foil, a brass vase cap, or a soldering iron tip. One reason may be to protect the metal from the air, which is usually in reference to a soldering iron tip. The other purpose may be to color the metal underneath, which we’ll address here. You may have seen it suggested that you tin all exposed copper foil on the surface of a panel before running a solder bead. (You will need to apply flux before tinning and again before running the bead.) Some people feel that this allows them to run the final bead more easily because all of the foil edges are already covered. Other people prefer to
May 05, 2010
I have some questions about Lead-Free Solder. Does it tarnish over time? Can you use patina on it? Does it flow like regular solder? Is it better than regular solder? We are sure that you arent the only one with these questions. Lets start with the question of whether or not its better than regular solder. Since the harm from lead is caused by ingestion, any project that will come in contact with food or food containers should be made with lead-free solder. In addition, anything that is handled, like jewelry or kaleidoscopes, should be made with lead-free solder. Hands have a terrible habit of making it into the mouth before they get washed. So, yes it is better than regular solder in these situations. As far as working with solder, you should be diligent about cleaning your hands after touching any solder. Dont eat, drink, smoke, or do anything