Deluxe High Heat Kevlar/PBI Gloves - 14" Length

$146.95 USD
Item# 17703
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

  • These gloves are rated at 1400 degrees for intermittent glass handling
  • Features an ultra-tough blend of heat blocking 22 oz


Product Description

The ultimate in high heat protection for freedom in your art! These gloves are rated at 1400 degrees for intermittent glass handling. Use to create three-dimensional art.

Features an ultra-tough blend of heat blocking 22 oz. PBI/KEVLAR. For additional wrist protection, glove also has a 32 oz. glass cloth cuff. And for extra protection while holding hot items, gloves feature a 22 oz. Thermonol palm patch and an a additional NOMEX/ARAMID® palm patch. 14 oz. wool lining. 14" length. Sewn with KEVLAR thread. 1 Pair. For greater arm protection see the 18" length #17704.

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  •   Great Gloves
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Pros : I love these gloves for both glass and pottery work, they keep your hands and in my case my lower arm free from the heat.
Cons : On the large size and very stiff to wear the first few times.
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