Celtic Circle Bevel Cluster

$29.95 USD
Item# 443822
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • Traditional Celtic design
  • When assembled 6" circle - 9 pieces
  • Hand crafted bevel cluster


Product Description

Grace your home with the beauty of traditional Celtic art based on designs from Ireland. Clear Celtic bevel cluster is 6" inches in diameter. Looks great on its own or incorporate it into a panel. 9 pieces total.

Delphi Tip: Always lay out bevel clusters on pattern before cutting glass to adjust for small differences. Expect your bevel cluster to "grow" approximately 3/16" overall, the amount is determined by assembly method.

Customer Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
5 star  
  2
4 star
  0
3 star
  0
2 star
  0
1 star
  0
See all customer reviews
Write a customer review

Product Images from Customers

Be the first to share product images with other customers
5 out of 5 stars
  •   Stunning Bevel
By on
Pros : This is a really pretty bevel cluster that fit together well. With very little additional glass cutting it made a beautiful panel for a wedding present.
Cons : Absolutely none!
Other Thoughts : Celtic knots are very popular. They also make lovely wedding gifts ...research celtic knots for meaning and you'll see what I mean. I made a little card to go with the panel that explained how the knot relates to marriage. It was a sweet gift.
Was this review helpful to you?  
5 out of 5 stars
  •   Celtic Circle Bevel Cluster
By on
Pros : Easy to fit, pieces were well cut.
Cons : None really, would like to see this offered in colored bevels.
Other Thoughts : This is a beautiful piece. Striking when finished.
Was this review helpful to you?  

See all customer reviews
Related Content
May 10, 2010
When and how did you get started in stained glass? Ive been interested in stained glass for as long as I can remember. As a child, I would sit in churches and watch the (often) biblical depictions come to life when a stray ray of sunlight cast its illumination our way. Sun shadows dancing. I dabbled in many media over the years, trying to find an outlet for some of the visions careening inside, but none of them took. Drawing, painting - even watercolours - no amount of professional training could guide my hand in a satisfactory way. But then there was the glass. I lived abroad for a few years, and wound my way through Europe on my way back to the States when I finished my Peace Corps Service. My last international destination was Paris, where one of my closest friends lives as an organist. Two beautiful autumn
Mar 22, 2013
Heres our list of the 5 hottest new and featured items from the March 2013 of Stained Glass News 1. Creators Premium Bottle Cutter What can the makers of the popular Cutters Mate and Beetle Bits Cutting Systems do with a bottle cutter? It turns out - A LOT. They have designed a premium, top-of-the-line bottle cutter that is sturdy, easy to use and gives superior results. We love the special features on the Creators Bottle Cutter, especially the aluminum slide bar ruler which makes cutting precise sizes a cinch, and the adjustable carbide cutting wheel so getting perfect pressure for an even score is a breeze. Want to learn more? See how it works with step-by-step photos and instruction. 2. Once You Try an Electric Mandrel Spinner, You Will Wonder How You Ever Created Beads Without One. With the Electric Mandrel Spinner, you will free yourself from arm
Apr 15, 2011
Glass Artist Karen Mamel had all but packed away her glass tools when she opened her E-mail inbox. Sharon Jones of Good Shepherd Hospice in Sebring, Florida was inquiring about a stained glass window in a newly built chapel. A man was donating the window in honor of his beloved wife. She had previously built windows for two other Florida Hospices and spent much of her free time visiting patients and volunteering for the organization. A cancer survivor and nurse, she felt a particular connection to the patients. She called friend and pattern designer, Lynda Chandler, to explain the challenge. The project was a five-and-a-half-foot round window facing west, Karen said. Beyond that, she had received little direction. Sharon at Good Shepherd had seen our work before and trusted us to come up with a good design. Karen and Lynda got to work. The pair met more than five years