1 Lb Crystal Clear Transparent Powder Frit - 90 COE

$25.95 USD
Item# B140198
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.


Product Description

Bullseye frits are made from crushed, screened and magnetically cleaned Bullseye Compatible sheet glass. Powdered frit form, packaged in a wide-mouth 1 lb. jar. 90 COE. Frits may be used in hot glass work such as light painting, pate de verre and kiln-casting, to name only a few of the many techniques made possible by these versatile little grains.

All Bullseye Stringers, Frit and Confetti are mixable for quantity discount.

The image below shows the product's packaging. The next image shows an example of how Bullseye powdered frit looks before and after firing.

Customer Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
5 star  
  1
4 star
  0
3 star
  0
2 star
  0
1 star
  0
See all customer reviews
Write a customer review

Product Images from Customers

Be the first to share product images with other customers
5 out of 5 stars
  •   more please
By on
Pros :
Cons :
Was this review helpful to you?  

See all customer reviews
Related Content
Jan 24, 2013
Heres our list of 5 Favorite New Items from the February 2013 edition of Stained Glass News. 1. Snowflake Casting Molds from Colour de Verre With the new premium mold from Colour de Verre you can make incredibly detailed, beautiful snowflakes. There are so many ways you can use these snowflakes. Hang them on their own (they are light) or incorporate them into projects. Were excited about how creative you can get making the snowflakes depending on the size of frit and firing temperature. LOVE them with dichroic. Check out the mold and free project sheets posted on our website. You wont believe the gallery quality of the pieces you can create. 2. Barefoot Tools are Back and Better Than Ever. Powder Vibe Electric Mandrel Spinner The Bearfoot Tools line has some of our customers favorite tool; and
Sep 20, 2010
Sometimes necessity is the mother of invention, and sometimes invention comes when you have nothing to lose. Early in my career, I had three metal-clay-and-fused-glass pendants fail in a single day. The glass cabochons simply shattered and fell away from the silver after the pieces were fired because I had neglected to cut an expansion hole underneath the cabochons. Augghh. Lesson learned. But now I was left with three ugly pieces of silver, each with small pieces of glass permanently fused into bizarre locations on the surfacea loss I could not afford. Weeks later, after tryingunsuccessfully to remove the glass, I decided to try fusing glass in patterns onto the surface of the pendants. The results were surprising, and the Stained Glass process was born This technique begins with any fired metal clay with a flat surface. Small shards of fusible glass are then attached to the silver. After
Jul 02, 2010
Have you ever noticed ugly, hazy, gray coloration around the edges of your full-fused designs? This is especially noticeable when placing darker colored or iridized glass designs on a lighter colored background but it can happen with any color combination. This phenomenon is known as edge-devit (devitrification) and is most often caused by grinding the glass edges prior to fusing. This also occurs when using a diamond blade saw to cut your glass. One glass manufacturer explains it this way; The roughened edges in the ground area create thousands of tiny points from which crystal growth can easily propagate. The best solution is to score and break the glass as close to your final shape as possible to minimize grinding (or better yet avoid it altogether). If you must grind you could try using a light coat of clear overglaze (i.e. Fusemaster Super Spray) on the ground areas to