Kaleidoscope Image Disk

$15.95 USD
Item# 7175
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

  • Unique design lets in optimum light for an exceptionally brilliant image
  • Fill with jewels, bits of glass for a custom look
  • The image disk is easily assembled in minutes


Product Description

Create A Custom Kaleidoscope
The Image Disk is a rotating chamber made by joining two clear glass domes. The unique design lets in optimum light for an exceptionally brilliant image! Easily assembled in minutes, the Image Disk can be filled with jeweled, bits of glass, etc. Each kit contains two 2-1/2" diameter glass domes with center holes, brass mounting eyelets, and instructions.

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Pros : Can't beat this quantity discount anywhere else .
Cons : no complaints.
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