1/4" Replacement Tip For Hakko FX-601

$22.95 USD
Item# 43965
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • 1/4 inch tip is great for stained glass projects
  • Even heat distribution for an even bead
  • Fits Hakko FX-601 Soldering Iron


Product Description

A 1/4" tip is great for leaded, copper foil stained glass projects.  Even heat distribution for an even bead. Fits easily into the Hakko FX-601 soldering iron.

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Pros : Love this tool. Love to be able to control the temperature.
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  •   1/4 replacement tip
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