5/64" Round U Hobby Lead Came – 3 Lb Spool

Price $44.95
Your Savings: - $10.00
Your Price: $34.95 USD   (23% Off)
Item# 4801
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • No extra boxing fee!
  • Contains approximately 80 feet of came


Product Description

This handy method of storing and dispensing lead will make your glass work easier than ever! No more bulky boxes to store or twisted lengths of came. This revolutionary new method of storing and dispensing lead will make your glass work easier than ever! With spooled lead there are also no extra boxing or shipping charges.

Hobby came has an extremely narrow face, allowing hobbyist to put a lead finish around small glass projects like suncatchers and stained glass night lights. Face measures 5/64". Standard 5/32" channel. Approximately 80 feet long.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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5 out of 5 stars
  •   Great size
By on
Pros : Great size when you don't have room for a big spool and really easy to unwind off the spool
Cons : none
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5 of 5 people found this review helpful
3 out of 5 stars
  •   Hobby came
By on
Pros : Maybe I am not using it correctly, but find very limited usage.
Cons : Really narrow edging, not useful for much. Also melts very quickly.
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4 of 4 people found this review helpful
5 out of 5 stars
  •   LOVE IT!
By on
Pros : I love this stuff! It is so pliable and the perfect size for my glass nugget suncatchers.
Cons : No cons.
Other Thoughts : Does it come in larger sizes for thicker nuggets?
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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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