3/4" Cathedral Stained Glass Chip Assortment - 640 Pieces

$49.95 USD
Item# 425361B
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

  • Assorted transparent cathedral glass chips
  • Ideal for glass on glass mosaics
  • Cut easily to create shapes and backgrounds
  • 4 lbs of assorted colors, approximately 600 chips

Product Description

Hand-cut 3/4" square chips are made of cathedral stained glass, which allows light to show through. Ideal for glass on glass projects. Bulk packs are excellent for creating transparent backgrounds. Perfect for mosaic application onto glass items like candle votives and suncatchers. Easily nip into smaller pieces with Wheeled Glass Nippers #2039. Pack contains 4 pounds, approximately 640 chips. Colors and packs may vary from image.

Mosaic Panel by artist Lisa Mason. Stained glass chip window pane by artist Shelly Wood of ARTful Salvage. Days of Summer wood window by artist Susie Kovac. From Delphi's Online Artist Gallery.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

Product Details

  • 3/4" square
  • 1/8" thick
  • 600 chips per package, 4 lbs.

Customer Reviews

4 out of 5 stars
5 star  
  1
4 star
  0
3 star
  1
2 star
  0
1 star
  0
See all customer reviews
Write a customer review

Product Images from Customers

Be the first to share product images with other customers
3 out of 5 stars
  •   OK Chips
By on
Pros : Nice package, I can cut them into different shapes.
Cons : Most of the "squares" are not square, they are more rectangle or diamond shaped or have a point on one side. Cannot use them for my original purpose of buying them.
Other Thoughts : If I couldn't cut them into smaller bits for other products, I would have returned them.
Was this review helpful to you?  
1 of 1 people found this review helpful
5 out of 5 stars
  •   love these chips!
By on
Pros : pretty colors, nice variety (even dependable when i have re-ordered), ready to use, great price, easy to cut
Cons : none
Other Thoughts : ready to use and not too sharp for beginners to play with -
Was this review helpful to you?  
2 of 2 people found this review helpful

See all customer reviews
Related Content
Feb 21, 2011
From fusing to stained glass, etching or mosaics, glass bottles are ready to be reused in spectacular art. Find creative ideas below from Delphi customers and artists like you, to get started. Cathedral Glassworks of BC, Canada designed the panel at right featuring a client’s favorite label by cutting a bottle in half and soldering it into a vineyard design. 2010 Online Art Glass Festival winner Pamela Buerger of Fenton,MI designed the panel, left, “Wine Anyone” with a glass bottle cut in half and incorporated into the design with a piece of red glass plated behind it to give the illusion of a bottle that’s always full. The 3-D Dragon sculpture, top left, by artist Steve Landrum of Mountain Home, AR was created from bits of bottles, paired with stained glass to create this fantastic sculpture with unique curved surfaces and contours. Artist Ramona Mauch of Exeter, CA captured
Dec 15, 2011
As a crafty person, the holiday time can be rough. Not only are we lugging around 7.4 million pounds of product to various craft shows, we also have the expectation upon us that we will hand make everyones holiday gift...because, were crafty like that (plus, you and I both know that it would KILL us to buy gifts that we could otherwise make - its in our DNA). So, at the end of the day - our backs and feet are killing us, wed rather die than smile or make small talk with one more person, we have a car full of stuff to unload (which we also both know will stay there for another 3 weeks until we cant stand it much longer)...and I have to MAKE a present for your sisters husbands aunts niece who is in college? Oy. Enter the scrap glass suncatcher slash holiday ornament. This
Aug 12, 2010
According to historian Paul Crist who wrote An Early History of Kokomo Opalescent Glass Company in 1998, the stories behind the company sound more like the makings of a soap opera than a business plan. But despite the companys somewhat fractured past, Kokomo has upheld its reputation for exceptional glass products. Since 1888, it has been producing some of the finest glass in the world, and remains the oldest manufactory in America of its kind. Charles Edward Henry opened Kokomo Glass Factory in Kokomo, Indiana after he managed to negotiate a free factory site and cheap gas rates with community leaders. The once agriculturally based town was booming with business opportunities thanks to the discovery of natural gas. Glass production began on Nov. 13, 1888. The company specialized in colored opalescent glass, which at the time was a relatively new product. The superintendent and chemist of the company, Henrys business