Foil Finishing Kit

Price $42.95
Your Savings: - $5.00
Your Price: $37.95 USD
Item# 6903
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

Product Features

  • 8 oz. CJ's Flux Remover
  • 12 oz. Liva Stained Glass Polish
  • 8 oz. Novacan Black Patina
  • 50 gram tube Simichrome Polish


Product Description

Finish any copper foil project like a pro! Our Foil Finishing Kit includes all the essentials for a perfect finish, at a special discount price.

Simichrome Polish adds a bright, protective film to solder, lead, zinc, brass or any metal. Black Patina for Lead and Solder turns lead or solder to the same dark color that occurs naturally over time. Use CJ's to remove oily flux after soldering and you'll prevent discoloring and oxidation that may occur with time. Flux remover is absolutely safe to use: non-toxic, non-abrasive, non-flammable and water soluble. This item cannot be shipped air.

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Pros : everything for starting up stain glass process
Cons : maybe you won't use everything right away but will have them when you do.
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Oct 16, 2017
When creating stained glass art, the size and type of foil can be tricky. For newcomers to this type of glass art, many questions arise as to which copper foil is the right one to use. Fortunately, Delphi Glass has some handy tips to help you make the right choice every time. 1. Foil width You might be inclined to select foil that creates skinny lines, however they are not as strong. That’s because you can’t apply as much solder. For most projects, you’ll find 7/32” copper foil will be suitable, however if you vary the width of the foil it will add more depth. If you’re using thicker glass, 1/4" foil will create a seam of normal width. But if you want special effects, take a razor knife and trim the copper foil after you apply it to the glass. Creating distance in your piece can be done
Aug 13, 2010
In my reading I keep seeing mentions of tinning. What is it, and how do I do it? Tinning is the term used to describe the action of putting a thin coat of solder over something else, for instance copper foil, a brass vase cap, or a soldering iron tip. One reason may be to protect the metal from the air, which is usually in reference to a soldering iron tip. The other purpose may be to color the metal underneath, which we’ll address here. You may have seen it suggested that you tin all exposed copper foil on the surface of a panel before running a solder bead. (You will need to apply flux before tinning and again before running the bead.) Some people feel that this allows them to run the final bead more easily because all of the foil edges are already covered. Other people prefer to
Oct 11, 2010
Dimensional or 3-D relief in glass art is making a very strong comeback for Fall 2010, and we predict it to be even stronger in 2011. Adding cast pieces will bring excitement and a novelty look to your work. The process is easy. When planning your project, consider elements of the design that could be made with glass castings. Once fired and cleaned, castings can be foiled and soldered into panels, lamps and lanterns, added to mosaics, or fired into fused art. Your finished project will have a sculptural look and will showcase your glass art abilities. The deer trophy stained glass panel by artist Teresa Batten is a wonderful example of 3-D castings. Each pinecone has a rich textured surface and adds realistic interpretation to the finished panel. The unique design not only captures the spirit of the piece but also invites the viewer to examine the work from